r/Damnthatsinteresting May 21 '22 Silver 17 Platinum 1 Helpful 19 Take My Energy 1 LOVE! 2 Narwhal Salute 1 Tree Hug 1 Gold 2 Wholesome 20 All-Seeing Upvote 4 Ally 1 Super Heart Eyes 1

The Bee lives less than 40 days, visits at least 1000 flowers🌺 & produces less than a teaspoon of honey. For us, it is only a teaspoon of honey, but for the bee, it is a life. ThankYou, Bees!🐝 Image

Post image
87.6k Upvotes

1.1k

u/hat-of-sky May 21 '22

A Western Honey Bee lives 30-60 days and produces somewhere between 1/12 teaspoon and 1 tablespoon of honey in that time. Drone bees produce none, and bees whose lifespans are mostly winter would produce little, while summer infertile females make the high end.

492

u/kamelizann May 21 '22

Idk why but a single bee producing a tablespoon of honey is super impressive to me. There's so many bees in a hive, if each of them is even producing a tsp on average that's a lot of honey. All from barely noticeable amounts of flower nectar. The flowers and plants which get most of their composition by pulling physical material out of the air. Its mind blowing to me how specialized and effective the machinery of nature is.

314

u/Aggressive_Mobile222 May 21 '22

I just had 3 tsp of honey in my coffee and didn't think much about it. Sorry to those lives of 3 bees who made my coffee a bit more bearable

19

u/omgudontunderstand May 21 '22

why honey in coffee? i use sugar but if honey is better im going to stop spending money on sugar

12

u/samiam2079 May 21 '22

I started when I got my own apiary and it helps with allergies tremendously. Doesn’t have to be in coffee, just 1tbsp per day helps as long as it’s still raw local honey.

→ More replies
→ More replies

223

u/Raygunn13 May 21 '22

I don't think you have to apologize, that bee was probably quite happy to follow its instincts to the end of its natural life. And I've read before that bees will simply leave if they don't like the way they're kept by beekeepers

154

u/[deleted] May 21 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

42

u/UnicornHorn1987 May 21 '22

No more bees, no more pollination, no more plants, no more animals, no more man.. ~ There's an interesting story where beekeepers went puzzled after seeing bees producing honey with blue & green colors.

17

u/Goal_Posts May 21 '22

Eh, kinda.

honey bees aren't that great at pollinating. native bees are.

→ More replies
→ More replies

5

u/joshdamnmit May 21 '22

Says we're his "sweetest hive".. We think he's blowing smoke.

9

u/veekcore May 21 '22

Queen bee was a real bitch in this hive. Terrible leadership, turnover rate is high with no proper hand over. Would not recommend. 0.5 stars

→ More replies

35

u/EarlGrey_Picard May 21 '22

As a novice bee keeper I can confirm my first bees hated me and left. The upside is, because they absconded (left the hive), I introduced honey bees for the first time in our area. We never had honey bees in the 20 years I lived there, only bumble bees.

It has been three years and I see them constantly returning to our yard for honey. I know it's them because they are Russian versus Italian.

→ More replies

10

u/I_cut_my_own_jib May 21 '22

I want to learn more about bees. They're so interesting, I wanna look for a series or a book or something. 🐝🐝

→ More replies
→ More replies

55

u/ForwardInstance May 21 '22

Surely with 3 tsp of honey your coffee tastes less like coffee and more like coke !!

29

u/thatoneotherguy42 May 21 '22

I usually can't taste much with coke so it doesn't matter.

→ More replies

3

u/BoopDead May 21 '22

You have to watch this hilarious moment from a great British trivia panel show called QI

David Mitchell goes on a hilarious rant about how saving an exhausted bee with a teaspoon of honey is taunting it because it's more honey than it's seen in its lifetime! Lmao

How to save a honeybee

→ More replies

65

u/Raccoon_Full_of_Cum May 21 '22

In other words, bees are specialized similarly to how different types of cells in our bodies are specialized. Social insects have strange genetic relationships with each other, so in some ways, it makes more sense to think of a colony as one collective organism.

As another example of this, bee hives regulate their temperature very tightly, similarly to how our bodies regulate their temperature.

10

u/totally_knot_a_tree May 21 '22

You are full of wisdom, as the raccoon is full of cum.

→ More replies

6

u/SexysNotWorking May 21 '22

Damn, that's interesting!

→ More replies
→ More replies

474

u/kernowgringo May 21 '22 Helpful

This is the European honey bee which is basically a domesticated animal and one of only a handful of bees who do produce honey in the world. There are a lot more wild solitary bees that do not live in colonies and do not produce honey but do an equally important job pollinating plants.

236

u/stupidiot16 May 21 '22 Silver

But of course, European honey bees get all the credit because other bees aren't profitable

40

u/Tao_of_Krav May 21 '22

Not yet at least, while not all species can be produced easily and many of them do not have the added benefit of making honey there is a significant amount of research/initiatives in recent years to use natives for wide pollination. Usually to fill in when Western Honey Bees do an inefficient job at pollination, such as on flowers that require buzz pollination

→ More replies

24

u/LunchTwey May 21 '22

I wouldn't say "profitable", more so because of the honey industry it's easier for everyone to know what this bee is. There is literally no reason for anyone to know what a Dasypoda hirtipes is.

16

u/andorinter May 21 '22

Dasypoda hirtipes

The fuck you just call me?

/s

→ More replies

14

u/ThallidReject May 21 '22

Insect blindness, like plant blindness, is rampant thanks to lacking ecology quality in school lessons.

People see a bee and assume its the bee, cause they dont know how diverse bees are.

→ More replies
→ More replies

24

u/falkenbergm May 21 '22

These are sadly also the endangered ones, not the honey bee. And adding more honey bees puts pressure on the solitary bees. So sad the marketing has always been about honey bees

→ More replies

4

u/Chubbychaser445 May 21 '22

I see people kill carpenter bees in mass every year and it kind of pisses me off. Especially when they continue to do it after I have given them multiple solutions that don’t require killing them AND explaining how carpenter bees are one of the most important pollinators in our region.

5

u/EveryDisaster May 21 '22

The best thing about carpenter bees is they are so docile and can get to know you because they live up to three years. They will actively scare away other insects from you. They'll become like little flying puppy dogs once they know you. And they can be easily moved into a makeshift home or decoy wood pile so they aren't bothering your house

2

u/Chubbychaser445 May 21 '22

Agreed. They sell nests, and they don’t do a shit ton of damage in one year, so the best thing to do when you find out you have a population near is wait out the summer, buy a nest, and fill in the old holes with caulk or wood dowel. Next summer they will buzz about happily and also not tear apart your porch.

→ More replies
→ More replies

1.8k

u/DrBix May 21 '22 Gold Tree Hug

And in general, if you don't bother them, they don't bother you. I have a lot of flowers in my yard and when they're out there pollinating, they'll let me pet them. I love bees.

EDIT My friends & neighbors think I'm nuts.

677

u/funkmaster29 May 21 '22

I like how over the last few years people have been getting less and less scared of bees. They got a bad wrap because of the murder hornets and their association with them.

262

u/Axe_wound_crotch May 21 '22

Have you ever seen “my girl?!?!”

263

u/Sammsquanchh May 21 '22 Gold

Anytime my dad couldnt find his glasses Id yell out “where’s his glasses he can’t see without his glasses?!?”. My mom and sister hated it.

169

u/[deleted] May 21 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

60

u/faltugiribuster May 21 '22

“So bee it.”

16

u/Nambino May 21 '22

I beelieve it!

→ More replies

14

u/TangentiallyTango May 21 '22

Gimme 5 bees for a quarter you'd say.

4

u/plumbthumbs May 21 '22

Which was the style at the time.

→ More replies
→ More replies

34

u/[deleted] May 21 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

8

u/cheebamech May 21 '22

I flat out stole this and texted it to my daughter; apologies.

5

u/MinionofThanos May 21 '22

Hahaha I do this to my wife, who also hates it.

“Babe have you seen my glasses!? Thomas J can’t see without his glasses!”

4

u/Hattless May 21 '22

Isn't that a line from Scooby Doo? I remember Velma saying that all the time.

→ More replies
→ More replies

28

u/slugo17 May 21 '22

You mean the 1991 propaganda film made by Big Mosquito to get the heat off themselves for a while?

→ More replies

8

u/Melquiades-the-Gypsy May 21 '22

First book I ever cried at as a kid. Could never bring myself to watch the movie.

15

u/garry4321 May 21 '22

Are you talking bout my giiiiiiiirl?

Mygirl

→ More replies

24

u/Stackfault67 May 21 '22

And the Africanized/killer bees in the 1970s and 1980s.

27

u/PzykoHobo May 21 '22

I am frankly terrified of bees (and hornets, wasps, yellow jackets, etc.). Just being near them sends me the opposite direction as fast as my chubby legs will carry me.

I'm not allergic. Been stung plenty of times, and I know the pain isn't that bad. Just afraid of them.

But I would never harm a honey or bumble bee. I understand and appreciate how incredibly important they are to the global ecosystem, and the fact that our environmental negligence is destroying their populations breaks my heart.

Wasps and hornets do not get the same respect from me, though.

13

u/mikettedaydreamer May 21 '22

I mean there’s a difference between a phobia and just being dramatic. Your case sounds more like phobia

8

u/hiwawy May 21 '22

I have the same phobia and feel the same way about bees and wasps lol. Although I’ve never been stung, so I’m not sure if I’d feel the same way after experiencing it! I also have a phobia of needles, so I have a feeling they are related 😅

→ More replies

6

u/TimidPocketLlama May 21 '22

I have a friend who is an entomologist. Even she calls wasps assholes.

→ More replies
→ More replies

6

u/Rajili May 21 '22

I grew up with a mom that would completely freak if a bee was near. Screaming, flailing arms, running away. So I always assumed bee stings hurt really bad. I got my first bee sting at the age of 37 and was pretty underwhelmed. It didn’t feel good and I wouldn’t get stung on purpose but damn it really changed my perspective.

→ More replies

11

u/nahog99 May 21 '22

Don’t know how old you are, but do you remember when the news was fear mongering about killer bees coming up from the south? They kept showing graphs and shit of how far they had pushed north in X amount of years.

8

u/DeanBlandino May 21 '22

That wasn’t really fear mongering? Killer bees are horrible. I’m extremely grateful we don’t have them where I live and likewise for murder hornets. Those things can kill you.

6

u/[deleted] May 21 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

13

u/pope_of_chilli_town_ May 21 '22

And on the other hand a garden snail can live up to 10 years in the wild and 25 in captivity.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

136

u/witchelina May 21 '22

They also really appreciate your help when they need it. I once rescued one from the swimming pool. A few days ago I escorted one out from my house without any problem. They are smart and know what you want to show them(flies are dumb af and don’t understand it when you show them the door and don’t get me started about the damn wasps).

Today we build a greenhouse in our garden and one of the bees got stuck inside the greenhouse. I gently guided it outside.

If you approach them slowly and with good intention you don’t need to fear them.

I really love bees. Seeing them in my garden makes me unbelievably happy. They are gentle, useful and super adorable.

19

u/KaiBishop May 21 '22

I've never had a bee enter the house but if it did I'd treat it like royalty. Don't get me started on how fucking stupid flies are. Moths are cute and majestic and can be pretty chill. Spiders actually get very scared of you and curl into a ball to hide. 😩😭

4

u/witchelina May 21 '22

I talk to bees like I talk to my cat „Aww, come here sweetie! Who’s a good girl? You are!“

63

u/Sabata11792 May 21 '22

For a bee, I'll take them outside. Hornets get the squish.

43

u/Ann_Summers May 21 '22

Hornets, wasps, flies and mosquitoes all get the squish. Lol

30

u/HappyGoPink May 21 '22

Yep. Bees and spiders get gently rescued and relocated. Wasps, flies, mosquitoes get the rolled-up newspaper treatment.

9

u/blunty_x May 21 '22

100% Bees and Spiders are bros and hate when a scared person always tells me to kill them out of fear when they come around. Bees are wonderful and a single spider will be out of sight while it murders every insect in your house

8

u/HappyGoPink May 21 '22

Yep, when I see spiders in parts of my house where they can't get hurt, I just leave them be. If they're skulking around, that means that there's something for them to eat skulking around, and I appreciate them taking care of that situation.

5

u/miaolongbao May 21 '22

I get it, spiders are bros, nature’s pest control, etc. - but I personally can’t imagine anything worse to find skulking around than a spider.

That’s the situation I’d need taken care of.

→ More replies

3

u/knoxollo May 21 '22

The only spiders I kill are wolf spiders (if I can get myself near enough), only because I have a massive phobia of them and go into a panic attack on sight. House spiders and especially jumping spiders are left alone, they can help keep the pests at bay and keep to themselves.

I adore bees and most insects, theyre fascinating. Wasps/hornets are alright, I'll try to get them outside if possible. Only reason I would kill them is because I don't want my dog trying to eat them the way he eats flies. Lol

Mosquitos, fleas, and gnats can go back to hell where they belong.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/Tetha May 21 '22

Hornets? Hornets are great. Hornets kill wasps and that's all I need. They are just huge buzzers.

4

u/Tom_Dynamite May 21 '22

Yeah exactly. I get hornets are loud and scary looking but they are very much in a "don't bother me and I leave you alone" mode. They aren't like wasps who fly up in your face and bother you constantly. Also like you said, they kill wasps. Also flies and other annoying flying bugs.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

22

u/bozeke May 21 '22

We have a very small yard but have a ton of tall wildflowers planted here and there; and in the spring and summer months it’s an absolute bee festival. Not just honeybees but bug bumbles and carpenter bees (I know they can be a problem for some houses, but they are so damn cute and dumb).

It’s so fun to just sit out with them buzzing all around, helping our tiny plot of veggies produce. They clearly appreciate our yard, and we appreciate them.

24

u/Mochigood May 21 '22

I love the bumble bees. When they get mad it's like "OOOHHH I'm going to fly circles around you and sometimes bump into you, and then you'll see!"

15

u/PaanuriEater May 21 '22

Just don't disturb the nest. Their cute demeanor falls off and you find out that they sting like yellowjackets- they don't lose the stinger and die. They just keep stingin'.

But outside of nest defense, it's very, very, very hard to get them angry enough to sting.

8

u/witchelina May 21 '22

I’ve never seen a mad bumblebee! That sounds funny!

7

u/Mochigood May 21 '22

They lift a leg up to show you they're mad. It's cute.

→ More replies
→ More replies

8

u/Mkxkidd May 21 '22

I work in a soda and sugar beverage recycling plant and I can tell you that you are 100% correct. We had 3-5 ginormous hives in our work area but as long as you didn’t swat them your good. 5 years never stung

3

u/Totally-Love-Animals May 21 '22

Isn't there something about some people are more prone to getting stung? Like, if you are smoking that deter them a bit etc.

My point being -> maybe they don't like your smell.

5

u/PennyAndAHalf May 21 '22

One summer my son was being chased by bees all the time. He inevitably got stung a couple times from doing kid things that disturbed his new companions. I finally figured out that it was the floral scent of his sunscreen. Changed to unscented … no more bee entourage, no more stings.

→ More replies

47

u/Undonefiretruck May 21 '22

You pet the bees? No wonder they think you're nuts

42

u/Lateralus_00 May 21 '22

Haha everyone look at this guy! He’s never pet a bee

→ More replies

33

u/jbibanez May 21 '22

They sit in your hand if you hold it out and stand still. Wasps on the other hand will sting you in the face for stepping into their hood

14

u/PaanuriEater May 21 '22

Yellowjackets will. Most wasp species are super duper chill, yellowjackets are just one species of wasp. A very assholish species, but still.

Paper wasps tend to be pretty chill, though I wouldn't pet them. Most solitary wasps won't even notice your existence unless you like step on them.

Hell, if Yellowjackets made their nests way up in treetops, they wouldn't have developed such aggressive defense mechanisms and would be welcome to have around, as they, much like paper wasps, utterly demolish pest insects in the area for food.

→ More replies

3

u/DrBix May 21 '22

Wasps are assholes. Kill on sight.

→ More replies
→ More replies

10

u/lycosa13 May 21 '22

They're so fuzzy though!

→ More replies

3

u/Atomheartmother90 May 21 '22

On the one hand yes, on the other Bob the Bee loves to show his dominance on my blueberry bushes by flying angrily in my face. I tell him to shoo, I’m not there to bother him and he usually backs off.

→ More replies

5

u/thatoneotherguy42 May 21 '22

I also pet bees, I taught my son to do it when he was about 8. They're just so fuzzy and people think we're nuts too.

9

u/Deskore May 21 '22

Wasps though can burn in hell

16

u/Lovis_Iovis May 21 '22

This meme is repeated on reddit often, and it’s unfortunate because wasps are incredibly valuable to every ecosystem where they are native. Not only are they prolific pollinators, they also keep other insect populations in check. In fact, there is a corresponding predatory wasp species for every single insect species considered a pest to humans. They feed these insects to their young and pollinate flowers as adults.

6

u/RiotIsBored May 21 '22

Also, I handle wasps frequently and never get stung. They aren't as aggressive as people like to believe.

Sure, if they feel that they or their nest is threatened, they'll sting. Otherwise, no issues.

→ More replies

3

u/CapnAntiCommie May 21 '22

You have strange friends and neighbors then. We have a butterfly/bee friendly garden and all out neighbors love it. We hold bees on our hands with flowers to look at them. Bees just wanna get along.

3

u/star_cannon7k May 21 '22

Why does this happen? I pet and talk to dogs in my locality. I have no friends, so I do that. Neighbors think I am nuts.

I observe lizards for hours because they display amazing behavior while stalking a prey. Relatives think I am nuts. Lmao! I am 21 and a behavioral ecologist.

→ More replies

72

u/Legeto May 21 '22

As a heads up, do not feed bees honey you have in the cabinet. They could be contaminated and you are more likely to infect the entire hive and wipe it out than save one tired bee. Sugar water is the way to go.

52

u/YMabDaroganCont May 21 '22 Silver

Giving a bee a teaspoon of honey would be like showing a very tired stonemason a whole cathedral

19

u/Legeto May 21 '22

Except then it brings it back home and infects the hive with a disease or fungus.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

192

u/electriceagle May 21 '22

Wow that’s a short life!

44

u/SuperGuitar May 21 '22

She said it was a good size !

→ More replies

352

u/FennPoutine May 21 '22 edited May 21 '22 Silver

I have probably visited way less than 1000 flowers, and have not produced a single drop of honey.

Truly, I have not lived a single day of my life...

11

u/[deleted] May 21 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies

186

u/chubbuck35 May 21 '22

Can you imagine finding out that the purpose of your entire 45-year career was for some giant to sweeten one bite of his food.

77

u/PaanuriEater May 21 '22

The entire purpose?

The first segment of their lives after they emerge from cocoons is the most important part of their jobs. Every worker starts out as a nurse bee- feeding brood, building comb, warming the brood, tending to the queen, hunting down and killing pests within the nest, and maintaining the hive.

It's only when they start getting old that they go out and forage for the rest of their lives. Once they aren't a nurse bee, they become a lot more expendable. Honey gathering isn't their entire purpose, it's their final purpose. And the one where their death doesn't matter as much, compared to the other stages of their lives.

They also gather a fuckton of pollen that humans don't use or consume, and that pollen goes to making lots of new baby bees, as it's chock full of the proteins and vitamins needed for growth. Sugar from flowers provides the energy, but proteins provide the building blocks. So even if humans take most of the honey, the vast majority of the lifework of the bees still stands in the form of their family and their home and their healthy children.

THem going out to get gas for the colony is still an important job, of course, but it's hardly their whole life's work.

It's just the part you care about.

12

u/The_great_Pi May 21 '22

now there's a fellow beekeeper who knows his/her shit

5

u/PaanuriEater May 21 '22

I actually am not a beekeep! I just love watching them on Youtube. I live in a place that's pretty cool, not ideal weather for a novice, and I'm in a pretty densely populated area so there's not much room for the three hives I'd want at a minimum. And most importantly, no place to put them that would be out of range of the dogs, which would almost certainly lead to conflicts in our fairly small yard.

→ More replies
→ More replies

39

u/AmpChamp May 21 '22

I have some bad news for you, bub.

97

u/ponmuruga May 21 '22 edited May 22 '22

Well that would apply to you too if you work for Amazon...

20

u/RibboDotCom May 21 '22

45 DAY career

15

u/Twooof May 21 '22

The point was to make a comparison to our lives.

3

u/Trivenger1 May 21 '22

Why the fk did A Bee Movie pop in my mind reading this

→ More replies

380

u/samiam2079 May 21 '22

And we should appreciate it accordingly. I know I do.

97

u/pegothejerk May 21 '22

Honey has never stopped being magical and used sparingly, to compliment my tea and peanut butter! So good.

42

u/JabbaThePrincess May 21 '22

You drink tea and peanut butter?

51

u/VikingRabies May 21 '22

I like it thick. If your tea ain't chewable, you're doing it wrong.

13

u/amu_munchauzen May 21 '22

I tried rock oolong now I have to go-to the dentist.

6

u/thedude37 May 21 '22

Ooolong johnson

→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/CrumbsAndCarrots May 21 '22

That’s true. I can’t think of any time I’ve been indifferent towards honey. I treat it like a precious commodity.

→ More replies

10

u/Tomoromo9 May 21 '22

What if we let them appreciate it instead?

→ More replies

14

u/kenix7 May 21 '22

By eating less of it. I mean, we never needed too much of it. Take it like this for example. We grew so used to the idea that we have to eat absolutely everything is edible, that we forgot that sometimes we can only taste something and remember it for our entire lives. We have to learn to control our appetites and in this regard, our inner desires. I'm not saying we shouldn't eat, but we should do it less than we do today. ( I'm not referring to or implying at all to the upcoming food crisis, but specifically to the idea above mentioned. In short, the crisis is an unrelated topic. )

15

u/fernadial May 21 '22

Same, I also don't eat honey because the bees create it for themselves.

→ More replies

16

u/[deleted] May 21 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies

16

u/TotallyNotNoble May 21 '22

The bees are going to be so stoked when they see this

11

u/SmotchMcDibs May 21 '22

Stealing their entire stuff will be fine so long as they know we're grateful.

5

u/liberonscien May 22 '22

Yeah, I know that I love having the products of my labor stolen when I know the thief is selling it to an appreciative person who…. doesn’t need it and merely wants it.

71

u/5teamed_Demur5588 May 21 '22

I learned this watching the documentary Bee Movie.

12

u/diacrum May 21 '22

Thanks! I’ll check it out.

13

u/prequelBEPIS May 21 '22

we do a little trolling

84

u/idc2011 May 21 '22 edited May 21 '22

Even more importantly, they pollinate our crops. Without insects there would be no grains or fruits.

35

u/Bayked510 May 21 '22

Your general point is true about fruit, but not about most grain which is wind pollinated.

3

u/BlackViperMWG May 21 '22

Iirc about 30-40 % of crops in general. And not just bees or just insect (flies, wasps, butterflies, beetles..), even bats, birds and other small mammals pollinate.

→ More replies

21

u/NotElizaHenry May 21 '22

Fun fact: honeybees were introduced to North America in the 17th century!

19

u/Sir_Snek May 21 '22

An unfortunate fact, too, as they compete with hundreds of species of native bees for space and resources.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

14

u/JaggedMetalOs May 21 '22

Thanks bees.

Thees.

5

u/killerfridge May 21 '22

Bless you Bees.

Blees.

→ More replies

10

u/eccehom May 21 '22

The Hoomans lives less than 100 (?) years, visits at least 10? workplaces 🏢& produces less than a teaspoon of money. For them(u know who them are), it is only a teaspoon of money, but for the hooman, it is a life. ThankYou, Hooman!👵👴👴🏿👵🧓🏿👴👵🏾

8

u/GuardingxCross May 21 '22

Bee: Pukes

Human: Thanks bee, very cool

7

u/Mubly May 21 '22

I always think it’s funny when these articles are posted. The U.S bee industry mistreats and routinely wiped out colonies of bees on the daily. But you never read anything about it for whatever reason

→ More replies

48

u/FastFishLooseFish May 21 '22

Here’s a good discussion on using honey to help tired bees.

21

u/nevus_bock May 21 '22

Thanks for posting it. My first thought was David Mitchell’s rant.

→ More replies

15

u/[deleted] May 21 '22 edited May 26 '22

[deleted]

12

u/Supermanliam May 21 '22

As a beekeeper I second this, could spread disease/virus between hives feeding honey from a different apiary. Sugar water is the best thing you can give a tired bee, 1:1.

→ More replies

28

u/charming_chameleon May 21 '22 Take My Power

I mean, they don't do it FOR us

You just take it away as if they do :/

10

u/spidersplooge- May 21 '22

Yeah, like cows’ milk. Honeybees are livestock. It’s what they’re here for. Incidentally, they’re bad for the environment just like cows.

10

u/disciples_of_Seitan May 21 '22

It’s what they’re here for.

Citation needed. "Everything is for humans to use" is exactly the kind of anthropocentrism that has resulted in the current mess of a climate sitatuation.

8

u/spidersplooge- May 21 '22

Nowhere in my comment did I defend or support dairy or honey industries. Just to be clear: I don’t. I think that introducing trillions of non-native honeybees is a bad thing for the ecosystem and I am against it.

3

u/OGRiceness May 22 '22

As the reply included your own words ; “it’s what they’re here for” - it leads to assume your stance on the subject.

Just to clarify why you got that reply.

→ More replies
→ More replies

13

u/PinkSockLoliPop May 21 '22 edited May 21 '22

Honey: Voted humans' favorite form of insect vomit!

3

u/I_Miss_Lenny May 21 '22

I mean have you had a better bug barf? I sure haven’t

4

u/ccaccus May 21 '22

Feel like there should've been a side campaign in the '90s when Heinz went through that weird colored ketchup phase. Bug Barf Honey in shades of green, purple, and orange.

→ More replies
→ More replies

5

u/[deleted] May 21 '22

Gotta save those bees!! Plant more flowers and make your little patch beautiful as well as doing a bit of good! We love bees :)

5

u/spidersplooge- May 21 '22

The bees that are endangered don’t produce honey, and most are solitary as well!

→ More replies

66

u/GambitDangers May 21 '22

Yeah. Or ya know maybe not for us.

→ More replies

58

u/RecognitionClear761 May 21 '22

What makes us think there honey is for us?

41

u/8bitdimensional May 21 '22

People are self-centered and only think about their own gain. And I'm sure both of us get some hate for this.

→ More replies
→ More replies

5

u/itwasntnotme May 21 '22

Happy World Bee Day!

4

u/RealLarwood May 21 '22

And here you're showing it a whole cathedral!

→ More replies

5

u/Successful-Oil-7625 May 21 '22

I fucking love bees. I have massive bumble bees flying around my garden all the time and I love watching them

3

u/Anduweeb May 21 '22

Bumblebees are just so cute, so fluffy and gentle! English isn't my first language and for many years I thought they were called humblebees, which made me like them even more :D

→ More replies

4

u/Moldy-Warp May 21 '22

So we should stop taking their honey and leaving them just sugar water.

→ More replies

15

u/knottydeadpool May 21 '22

They don't do it for you.

→ More replies

23

u/MrsWilliams May 21 '22

Thank you bees. I’m sorry most humans are trash.

9

u/WhatuuupKrisp May 21 '22

The ones who exploit them for their honey? Yeah.

→ More replies

15

u/dugerz May 21 '22

They don't want your gratitude, they want you to stop stealing their honey

→ More replies

11

u/Starman68 May 21 '22

Bees in winter live longer, obviously. Beekeeper here. Overwintering bees live all the way through winter.

→ More replies

38

u/BernieDurden May 21 '22

Ok cool. Now let's please stop stealing the honey they make. It's meant for their babies, not us. The honey industry is exploitation.

32

u/Anduweeb May 21 '22

As far as I know, the honey is made for all bees, not just babies. They eat it in the Winter when they can't get other food. But I agree, honey is not made for us.

→ More replies

15

u/RisingQueenx May 21 '22 Wholesome

It's so unbelievably cringey when we thank animals for things we steal from them.

→ More replies

30

u/JJKirby May 21 '22

For us, it is only a teaspoon of honey, but for the bee, it is a life. ThankYou, Bees!

I think the bees would say a bigger thank you if we just left them and their honey alone.

That is entirely the whole reason why some people abstain from eating it in the first place, can't y'all see your cognitive dissonance?

28

u/Melonfucker666 May 21 '22

Yeah because we should be eating their life’s work. Dumbass carnist logic

26

u/Dolphintorpedo May 21 '22

Thank you bees? Mf the bee isn't donating to good will. That honey isn't for you.

Not All bees make honey. In fact only one type our of hundreds make honey

21

u/Fedl May 21 '22

Leave the honey to the bees. Human don’t need it.

→ More replies

15

u/lakilukez May 21 '22

It like robing someone from all his life possessions and then thanking him for his shit you just stole.

3

u/FailedCanadian May 22 '22

It's not like I am killing them, I am just taking the extra stuff they clearly don't need!

To be clear, I am talking about the car I just took, not honey.

→ More replies

3

u/cleomay5 May 21 '22

Life lessons.

3

u/JulesVega37 May 21 '22

Now I want synthetic honey

3

u/WhatuuupKrisp May 21 '22

There are many amazing plant based alternatives to honey, luckily ☺️

3

u/Jackfly0114 May 21 '22

Me when I take their life’s work because I had a cold.

→ More replies

3

u/asdf0909 May 21 '22

Almost every bee you’ve ever met is dead

3

u/red_purple_red May 21 '22

This feels like a psyop to further immiserate the working class.

3

u/Yu-Neek May 21 '22

imagine being one of the 20k redditors to upvote this post that copy and pasted the caption from the post it was reposting.

3

u/FoShoShiz May 21 '22

Hard little workers they are. They help pollination a lot too.

3

u/sdSPM May 21 '22

And remember… babies younger than one year of age should not be given honey.

3

u/thewholerobot May 21 '22

Damn straight, I'm with this guy, fucking whiners don't deserve it.

3

u/WhatuuupKrisp May 21 '22

"Thank you"? They're not doing it for us, what you meant is "I'm sorry".

38

u/[deleted] May 21 '22 Tree Hug

Go vegan. Stop using animal by-products.

9

u/Mrcollaborator May 21 '22

We really shouldn’t steel their honey.

39

u/ggggeeewww May 21 '22

Or we can stop eating honey. It's just sugar with a flavor.

→ More replies

37

u/xyts1 May 21 '22 Silver Tree Hug

People should really stop pretending to love bees and be thankful for their “service”. They didn’t decide to give us their work, they were forced to. We have no right to breed them and take their honey.

→ More replies

4

u/Ok-Recognition-700 May 21 '22

They're not doing it for you. Leave the honey for the bees. They need it to survive.

→ More replies

12

u/liberonscien May 21 '22

They don’t do this willingly. We steal it from them. Go vegan.

→ More replies

31

u/EdgyGamer2000 May 21 '22

Humans shouldnt consume honey.

→ More replies

6

u/LittleJerkDog May 21 '22

They don't make honey for us, we steal it from them.