r/antiwork Jan 14 '22 Silver 5 Helpful 16 Wholesome 10

So sorry, I'm broke so I can only pay you $77 for my food. You were great though.

Post image
30.2k Upvotes

View all comments

18.6k

u/doho121 Jan 14 '22 Silver Gold Wholesome

The fact that US service workers depend on tips is wrong. Employers should pay them a living wage.

3.7k

u/hyperbolic_retort Jan 15 '22

Yep. It's on the servers boss if they're not getting a livable wage.

5.2k

u/Quinn0Matic Jan 15 '22 Gold Helpful Wholesome

Tipping should be illegal, and I say that as someone who relies on tips.

784

u/SB6P897 Jan 15 '22

You see more and more fast food places asking for tips. Right now it’s fun and dandy while they get paid minimum or more. But the fast food pay enjoyment gonna change real fast when fast food restaurants get the legal slip to pay less than minimum cuz “tips are income and will justify it”

390

u/deniercounter Jan 15 '22

In Denmark a McDonalds worker earns 22 USD per hour, 5 weeks paid holiday and paid parental leave from the beginning. So it is possible!

238

u/Sckanksta Jan 15 '22

In Denmark you also doesn't pay a fortune just to see the doctor which counts for something 😁

122

u/SavagecavemanMAR Jan 15 '22

Denmark starting to sound pretty good…..

40

u/Kortezxero Jan 15 '22

...that's what I'm sayin'

8

u/Perssepoliss Jan 15 '22

Denmark has conscription

3

u/MasculineCompassion Jan 15 '22

We are working on that, though

→ More replies
→ More replies

4

u/BlueKante Jan 15 '22

They also founded trolltrace.com

→ More replies

8

u/Davido400 Jan 15 '22

Unfortunately they recently outlawed bestiality, shame that (do I need to put /s?)

10

u/ReddityJim Jan 15 '22

Government over reach if I ever saw it.

3

u/Big-Weather2703 Jan 15 '22

Government over reach around*

→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/Willy_Tingler Jan 15 '22

As someone from the UK, I hear a lot about things being really great in Denmark, especially the level of wages. But then I also hear people say things like “yes but the cost of living is also very high.” Is this true? Or is it just a myth? What is the cost of living like in Denmark?

→ More replies

3

u/skynetnord Jan 15 '22

About the same and n Australia mate too🤙🇦🇺🌄

3

u/Honestbabe2021 Jan 15 '22

Wow that’s awesome, America is so barbaric.

3

u/cookiemonstah87 Jan 15 '22

I actually just started working at Starbucks in the US. My pay isn't that high, but the company as a whole is moving to paying everyone a minimum of $15/hr and adjusted higher for more expensive areas by this summer. Even as part time, we get 2 weeks paid vacation, paid sick time, 2 paid isolation periods per quarter in case of covid, healthcare benefits, and other things I'm not remembering at the moment. It's even possible in the US! Other companies just don't want it to be.

2

u/SB6P897 Jan 15 '22

Had no idea, but that’s good! Not arguing fast food workers shouldn’t be paid well, I’m more concerned with if the obligation to tip should be the way to make that happen. Does Denmark have a strong tip etiquette presence? I ask cuz American service and food industries tend to avoid paying at least minimum because of the obligation of tip standards here

12

u/Mountain-Dane Jan 15 '22

From my experince, it is rare for us danes to tip restaurant workers etc. Their wages are decent enough to make a living on, but a tip does occur from time to time.

Source: used to work at a danish Steakhouse, made 17usd/hour base wage. Got evening and weekend pay on top of that as well.

5

u/Triquestral Jan 15 '22

Yeah, tips are definitely voluntary in DK. My husband and I usually tip, but it’s usually like 5-10% and they’re still often surprised and happy.

6

u/BamseMae Jan 15 '22

Dane here, no we don't. We don't really tip. Only if service is exceptional.

2

u/Nyohn Jan 15 '22

In sweden we don't tip in fast food redtaurants, most people order via app or screens anyway so you can't even tip. On other restaurants and bars it's possible to tip but it's usually not too much. Plus there's the fact that most people don't use cash anymore so I'm not certain how the tips are distributed to the workers.

I know some places just split every shifts tips among the workers that shift and add it to their paycheck but not sure if that's standard or not

2

u/Donald12020 Jan 15 '22

Good to know thank you for that

→ More replies

221

u/zentoast Jan 15 '22

Yeah a while back I used to work at Sonic, and one day corporate decided all the carhops were gonna start getting tip wage. Luckily I was a manager by then, but considering most folks don’t know you should tip at Sonic it was a certain kind of hell for the folks who worked with me.

147

u/something6324524 Jan 15 '22

luckly things seem to be going more towards if the company doesn't want to pay for workers they don't get workers in recentt imes.

152

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

35

u/Dianthor Jan 15 '22

As far as I understand, tipped employees are still guaranteed at least minimum wage, no? If the value of their tips is less than the threshold to reach minimum wage the employer is obliged to pay the difference. Does this not occur?

43

u/starfreeek Jan 15 '22

Yes employers are legally required to make up the difference between what the tipped employee makes and the state min wage if it is less that pay period. That being said min wage is way to low in most places.

42

u/Usedtabe Jan 15 '22

Legally required and what actually happens are two different things. Many waitstaff have been let go when trying to get their management to do their part.

4

u/Super_Nisey Jan 15 '22

Yep when I waitressed I was taught to always put my tips at a fixed amount, regardless if I actually received that much

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

8

u/TequilaAndJazz Jan 17 '22

You're being sucked into the neocoon mindset of looking at things from the perspective of a consumer instead of the perspective of a worker. Don't fuck over workers because you don't like tipping. Fight for legislation.

→ More replies
→ More replies

62

u/AnonymousPineapple5 Jan 15 '22

TIL I’ve been an asshole every time I’ve ever been to Sonic

109

u/MarkTNT Jan 15 '22

I'd say Sonic have been assholes every time you've been there, you already pay for the products, they should be paying their own staffs wages.

3

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

I don’t think that’s the intended take away

→ More replies

3

u/karmannsport Jan 15 '22

No you haven’t. You don’t fucking tip at fast food places. Tipping culture is so fucking out of hand in this country it’s ridiculous. I’m already paying for a service. I shouldn’t be expected to give extra because its your actual income. Tipping is supposed to be because “Damn! You REALLY went above and beyond what was expected!” If what I’m paying for the service isn’t enough for the service…then the service provider should be charging what the service is worth. I fucking hate tip culture in the US.

12

u/aerowtf Jan 15 '22

fuck that. If i’m still paying $10 for a shitty burger, i’m not tipping a fast food server. Lower your prices then. sheesh. Never even thought of tipping a sonic employee tf

2

u/IWillKarateKickYou Jan 15 '22

I give them a dollar usually cause i feel bad when i heard they are on the 2.13 an hour or whatever but you are right. Their prices are already ridiculous for freezer food or a cheeseburger they should be able to pay staff

7

u/ThighMommy Jan 15 '22

That... shouldn't matter. Unless they were making > minimum wage beforehand, then they're getting screwed

→ More replies

2

u/bea_corrine Jan 15 '22

I didn't know you were supposed to tip at Sonic until I started working there. Thank goodness we got normal minimum wage at least. I would usually only make like $10 in tips after a 5-hour shift.

→ More replies
→ More replies

90

u/simbaismylittlebuddy Jan 15 '22

I bought prepared sushi today from the mall food court, literally selected it out of the self serve fridge and handed it to the cashier. She gave me napkins and chopsticks that’s it, the terminal asked me for a tip, uh fuck no. And I always tip 20% but that’s a line too far.

82

u/sam_sneed1994 Jan 15 '22

This week I bought a couple of t-shirts online and after I approved the purchase it sent me to another screen where it asked me if I would like to leave a $3 tip. The world gone mad with asking for tips for just about anything now.

3

u/riflinraccoon Jan 15 '22

The only time I got asked for a tip online after making a purchase (so far) was when I made a purchase from a small niche company that made products for an undeserved community. I did tip bc I'm greatful for their company and the work they do. But a t-shirt? Gtfoh.

16

u/simbaismylittlebuddy Jan 15 '22

WhAat!? That’s obscene. Who would you be tipping? The fucking algorithm?

19

u/Daladain Jan 15 '22

I bought a t-shirt from a coffee shop in ann arbor Michigan. tshirt was like $25. My friends then girlfriend was working there at the time. I paid th $25 plus tax and she yelled at me for not tipping. I was like, the girl got it off the hook for me, its over priced, and you expect me to tip?

7

u/Resident-Science-525 at work Jan 15 '22

If you want a sign that tipping culture has reached peak ridiculousness...

To-go orders want tips. Drive thrus want tips. Cashier stands want tips.

But keep in mind that is put in place by EMPLOYERS who will most likely pocket that money. It is rich employers getting richer.

7

u/SnooPeripherals1595 Jan 15 '22

To go orders should get tips. A lot of the time people making your to-go orders in a restaurant are making $2 an hour. The maximum wage I've heard of for a to-go person is $4.50. they place your order they put everything together and make sure everything is right and they bring it to you at your car. And even if they're not bringing it to your car, they still deserve some kind of tip for doing all that for you. That's how they survive.

3

u/Resident-Science-525 at work Jan 15 '22

Point made.

I live in California so those types of workers make at least minimum wage. My view was myopic and lacking context.

3

u/Random_Username311 Jan 15 '22

The tip is for the waitstaff/bus/bar back/bartender, the chefs and kitchen staff should be paid by the resturant owner.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

4

u/Advanced-Prototype Jan 15 '22

Yeah, I don’t get that. They aren’t adding any value whatsoever. It’s basically digital panhandling.

5

u/UrLate4Tea Jan 15 '22

I went into a take and bake pizza place the other day. They make commonly ordered pizzas ahead of time, wrap them, and place them in a cooler at front of shop for you to take up and carry out. This place is in a very very low cost of living place in the US (we bought a 4bed/3 bath in the best neighborhood, 2,800 sq. Ft. Extremely nice quality finishes for under $160k) and the shop pays the employees $15/hr.

They recently updated the credit card machines to prompt for a tip. Even the cashier was embarrassed. She said, "OH, that's new. You can just click there to decline."

→ More replies
→ More replies

35

u/Meyou52 Jan 15 '22

As someone who does a bunch of work for delivery services and therefore makes most of my money on tips, I’m never tipping a fast food restaurant. That’s insulting. If they get to the point where that offsets paying their employees I don’t think they’re going to have workers/stay open very much longer.

4

u/todjbrock Jan 15 '22

Well, many ppl don’t know if tip + wage doesn’t meet or exceed minimum wage, the restaurants are obligated to make up the difference. Yes, not the best thing, but the servers ARE legally guaranteed at least minimum…

Whether that’s enough or not for what they do is another conversation, of course

5

u/International_Act299 Jan 15 '22

I used to work at restaurant a long time ago. Worked 3 years. Never got a check stub. Comes to find out. They was saying I was making tips that I didn’t. Bc if my (tips and 2.13<7.25) then they would have to come out of pocket. So management every week would. And adjust everyone’s amount of declared tip. Bc as a tip employee u had to declare ur tips at the end of ur shift. Personal experience

4

u/todjbrock Jan 15 '22

Umm… that sounds like straight scam? Minimum ($2.whatever-depending-on-state) is your regardless. They don’t get to stick you on $7.25 and collect tip. By law, owners are NOT allowed to pocket tips if they have any kind of server employees period.

5

u/Tiresiasksksk Jan 15 '22

If this happens, will American people accept without a fight? And if so, do we deserve our fate? Is our fate “worth it”? The American worker seems happy to put up with much abuse, I begin to wonder if it isn’t all some strange BDSM kink.

16

u/-smartypints Jan 15 '22

I will never tip at fast food, and I always tip at least 20% when I eat out. Often more if my bill is pretty small.

7

u/qoning Jan 15 '22

My biggest problem with this is that the line of what's fast food can become pretty blurry. I simply tip if I'm getting service throughout my stay and I'm not required to handle my own stuff. Like if I'm at a coffee place that has a window but you can sit down after you got your order, that's not a tip situation.

11

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

[deleted]

7

u/SB6P897 Jan 15 '22

I do too and i kinda wanna say no cuz I’m feeding the beast of tip wage by contributing. But if I say no I also feel like an asshole, especially in places like Dutch Bros where they ask how much you wanna tip on the tablet but don’t let you press it. Like sure, lemme just announce that I don’t want to tip thanks.

11

u/Conscious_Bug5408 Jan 15 '22

Have to fight it. Those square tablets asking how much you want to tip are going everywhere now. They will make their way to your oil change shop, grocery stores, and start asking for tips at best buy and target soon.

9

u/BurntPoptart Jan 15 '22

And I will continue tapping no tip every time I see it.

5

u/qoning Jan 15 '22

Better yet if you have to actually put in 0.00. Gives me extra satisfaction for telling you to fuck off for trying to guilt me.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/tacorunnr Jan 15 '22

I think In N Out starts 15 and goes up to 20

→ More replies

3

u/xTurkishBruvx Jan 15 '22

Way i see it you earned those fucking tips. Pay the living fucking wage. And if they earn tips its a reflection of how good their service is. I tip in the UK but thats genuinely because Im happy with the service. And sometimes my mates can be boisterous, so ill give a tip for putting up with my mates jokes. For example the waitress asked my mate “how did you find your steak?” My mate replied “i just looked next to the potatoes and there it was” shit like that.

3

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

I see it everywhere where I live. Coffee shops, chipotle and similar restaurants, mom and pop restaurants, boba tea 🧋 shops, etc…

6

u/t_wop-_- Jan 15 '22

I went to subway the other day as it asked if I wanted to tip the lady when I checked out I was like for what doing your job and making my sub like don’t you get a decent hourly rate? And the lady was rude asf I was like hell no

2

u/Back_Action Jan 15 '22

When the staff is rude, it makes the decision making so much easier!

2

u/Tacklas Jan 15 '22

A slip-ery slope

2

u/hunt35744 Jan 15 '22

I refuse to tip places like subway or McDonald’s and it’s he like. If it’s sit down, absolutely I tip unless you really piss me off but even then I tip just not the 20%+ I normally do. I do agree that tips should not exist at all.

2

u/MediocreCelebration2 Jan 15 '22

Don’t forget job ads on indeed that will post a wage and then not tell you until the interview that your flat rate is actually less than that and the wage they posted is what you “should” make with tips/commission. Like no that’s manipulative as shit post the flat rate or I’m walking out of the interview.

→ More replies

781

u/DanTheRocketeer Jan 15 '22

Tipping shouldn’t be illegal, it should be bonus. That’s how it’s is pretty much everywhere other than the US - the servers get paid a living wage and if they get tipped it’s either theirs to keep or split amongst all the servers (the former being the better system).

335

u/codify7 Jan 15 '22

In Japan they get offended if you tip, in their system they price the food at value for what it’s worth and to tip extra is to be insulting.

239

u/Vpc1979 Jan 15 '22

In Japan they will pay for the your uniform ( if required) your train pass to work, you also have a government pension and health care. Pretty much you only have to pay rent and food

103

u/Nirmalsuki Jan 15 '22

Do people have to pay for work uniforms in any country? If I was ever asked to pay for a work uniform, I won't even go the first day.

165

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22 edited 23d ago

[deleted]

26

u/rednut2 Jan 15 '22

That is insanity. Can you claim it on your tax return at least?

18

u/SwitchRicht Jan 15 '22

It would have to be above the standard deduction for you to start claiming . So depends why other expenses you are claiming .

→ More replies

2

u/wyte_wonder Jan 15 '22

you can write it off as well as millage at like 0.54cents a mileas well as alot of thing

2

u/Cloberella Jan 15 '22

If you spend less than $3,000 (I believe), you just get the standard deduction.

→ More replies

21

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

[deleted]

4

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies

2

u/SoftNSquishy Jan 15 '22

When I worked for dildomino's I got paid like $5.50 an hour and had to buy my own uniforms. The owner of that franchise is a (ultra Christian Conservative) gaping asshole anyway though, should have ran when I had the chance. So glad I don't work those kinds of jobs anymore, it's absolutely soul destroying.

→ More replies

49

u/NoMusician518 Jan 15 '22

I had to show up to my first day of work with 350 dollars worth of tools out of my own pocket.

9

u/Cloberella Jan 15 '22

Join a Union, they'll provide you with your equipment. I know people bitch about the dues, but the benefits greatly outweigh the $35 a month. I mean, with your Journeyman card that's only one hour of pay a month anyway. Plus, pensions are a beautiful thing.

→ More replies
→ More replies

4

u/Triquestral Jan 15 '22

I’ve never had a job requiring a uniform in Denmark, but my daughter works part-time in a grocery store and they just gave her the logoed polo shirts that she has to wear. I am 100% sure that’s standard.

→ More replies

4

u/Sansabina Jan 15 '22

You folk need to unionize!

9

u/Djildjamesh Jan 15 '22

Well this is fucked up

4

u/Cloberella Jan 15 '22

Yep, and if you bought it from them (a lot of places will sell you their uniform rather than have you source your own pieces) and don't return it when you leave, they can withhold your final check, or dock your pay.

→ More replies

3

u/Vexachi Jan 15 '22

Does this include PPE for you guys??

4

u/Mr_Leeward Jan 15 '22

Fuck that.

2

u/something6324524 Jan 15 '22

yeah i've refused to work anywhere like that, unless the dress code is just wear some regular decent cloths then nope. If it is just wear some regular decent clothes then i'm fine and i just put on a normal shirt and pants

2

u/one-hit-blunder Jan 15 '22

They start them young. Even school uniforms are typically purchased at the expense of the student/ parents, here in Canada at least. B.s.

→ More replies

19

u/fleetingsparrow92 Jan 15 '22

I got one uniform and one work shoe allowance when I worked at Tim Hortons in Canada. Anything extra we had to pay for/buy ourselves.

4

u/Hopeful_Mouse_4050 Jan 15 '22

I was given the name of a shoe retailer to use if I wanted a discount when buying my own nonslip shoes.

4

u/lorenzomofo Jan 15 '22

Damn, they give you one shoe and make you pay for the other shoe.

57

u/commanderjarak FALGSC Jan 15 '22

The US.

9

u/UnlikelyKaiju Jan 15 '22

At least you can claim the cost of your uniform on your taxes, but that typically requires keeping the receipt until you finally file.

5

u/hippoctopocalypse Jan 15 '22

And knowing the horribly arcane tax code

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

25

u/Ghost0fDawn Jan 15 '22

You DONT have to pay for your work uniform?

In the US you're pretty much responsible for anything you wear, almost always.

I work outside, in different weather conditions and this generally means having cold weather clothing, extra layers, clothing im willing to get dirty and damaged from use, waterproof boots, gloves for cold or physical protection so I don't get hurt or strained. Hearing protection.. etc.

Never once have I ever had the cost of those items put on the company. They would laugh in your face.

19

u/BornListen6622 Jan 15 '22

If you work in the US, it's an OSHA requirement that your company buys your PPE for you. The uniform may on you, but your PPE like hearing protection is required to be covered and supplied by your company. If your company isn't providing you proper PPE, that's a major OSHA violation

3

u/Delicious-Ad5161 Jan 15 '22

I didn’t know that. There have been spats between the various employers on my work site that have resulted in people going without PPE if they don’t purchase their own. I’ll keep this in mind for the future.

12

u/Occyfel2 Jan 15 '22

At my workplace in Australia my uniform was free and I got a few dollars a week to cover the cost of cleaning the uniform. What is wrong with the US

10

u/BloodyRob68 Jan 15 '22

I'm an archaeologist in Sweden. My employer has provided me with two pairs of protective shoes, two pairs of trousers with knee pads, a goretex jacket with detachable lining so I can use it year-round, several pairs of gloves (winter and summer), sweaters, loads of tshirts with company logo, underwear, hats, helmet etc. All in all, I reckon I got about 10000 SEK (1200$) of work wear. I've paid for nothing. That's the norm here. I've never hears of anyone having to pay for work stuff, it's absurd.

9

u/zenchemin Jan 15 '22

That sounds like a fucking scam and if it happened to me in my country I'd go straight to the labour board and complain about it. Surely a breach of the worker laws, I'd expect all tools and equipment for me to do my job to be provided by my employer. USA is getting stranger every day, what a country. It's all just exploitation of the people who barely have anything at all.

8

u/Gauffrier Jan 15 '22

No in Europa, Netherlands you don't pay for your workcloathes... Hard-nose boots etc is paid for.

6

u/Steffelonio Jan 15 '22

And you can't get fired for bullshit reasons.

3

u/RenoHex Jan 15 '22

Generally, in jobs that required me to wear a uniform, it was either provided by the employer straight away, or they gave me the specs and reimbursed against a receipt. They tend to prefer the former because it's cheaper for them, Economies of Scale or something.

My favourite was the job that required me to wash my work clothes at home. In return, they gave us enough laundry detergent every month to last me two months (I live alone, everyone else had families).

3

u/mediamalaise Jan 15 '22

Also gonna have to disagree on that 'almost always'

Casino industry guy and everyone who is required to wear an actual uniform gets it issued to them and maintained by the casino except for footwear and, like, underwear. The rest of us office worker types in the back who have to adhere to a dress code? We're on our own for that.

3

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

I would rephrase to :"You HAVE to pay for your work uniform?!?!"

→ More replies

3

u/meowpitbullmeow Jan 15 '22

It comes out of your first paycheck

3

u/Triddy Jan 15 '22

My part of Canada, if the Dress Code is something Generic (eg. Wear a Black Button down Shirt and Jeans), then it's legal to require the Employee to provide that.

If the Dress Code is specific (T-shirt with the company logo), or a safety requirement (Chef Uniforms), then the employer must pay for it.

2

u/jersey_girl660 Jan 15 '22

It’s the same in my state in the us and many others though it should be federal. Federal law encourages employers to at least reimburse employees for such things but doesn’t technically require it.

2

u/Stratostheory Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 15 '22

My last job I think I paid $50 total for 11 shirts and pants, all of them had my name patch sewn on them and then like $20 a week for laundry services. Was a machine shop and I got covered in a lot of oil and solvents working there so laundry service kept that shit out of my washer at home.

I wasn't required to wear the shirts and pants, but the other alternative was to ruin my regular jeans and t-shirts and have to wash that nasty shit out myself so I shelled out.

2

u/Classic_Beautiful973 Jan 15 '22

In the US, often, not sure about elsewhere

→ More replies

3

u/MossyTundra Jan 15 '22

I worked at a restaurant that was heavily sponsored by Under armor. I had to wear under armor shoes (70$ out the gate) and 25$ for our shirts.

→ More replies

134

u/yes_thats_right Jan 15 '22

I had a cab driver get out of the car and chase me down to return the tip. They view customer service as part of their job. Amazing concept right Americans?

40

u/Nightshader5877 Jan 15 '22

It's because America feels like it's built on too much greed.

51

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

It's because America feels like it's built on too much greed

2

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

The movie “Wall Street” from 1987 has the famous quote “greed, for lack of a better word, is good”. It seems American Businesses heard that quote and ran with it as hard and as far as possible with it. We’ve lost our perspective here and forgot to give a shit about our neighbors.

2

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

I can hear Michael Douglas' delivery even though I haven't seen that movie in years!

→ More replies

7

u/iwifia Jan 15 '22

If you deal with another person then customer service is part of your job. From an American.

7

u/yes_thats_right Jan 15 '22

Ive lived in the US for 12 years and I wish more people felt the same.

Also, they should be paid a living wage!

7

u/iwifia Jan 15 '22

Totally agree. I actually used to frequent (pre covid and baby) a bar that paid there staff a salary plus tip. Single bar, one location, great place and always booming, but everyone got a livable paycheck and everyone shared tips. I think at the time it was $10 an hour for servers and cooks, servers with a bartending license got $15 since they could do 2 different jobs, kitchen and floor supervisor (floor super was the highest rank person scheduled) got $20 an hour. Everyone got tipped out the next day they worked for the last shift so they could get the full days tip and not just the "good hours".

I only knew two people who left there in 7 years. One got fired and one moved across the country.

→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/whatawitch5 Jan 15 '22

Maybe because in Japan they are earning a living wage plus healthcare, free education, and a comfortable pension at their job, rather than scrounging in constant poverty like comparable workers in the US. When you’re hungry or can’t afford your meds, no tip is ever returned over the lofty idea that “customer service is part of the job”. Not when that tip means literally putting some meat on the table this week or buying your kid’s cold medicine.

Maybe if US workers weren’t living in a “Hunger Games” reality we could afford to be more generous about turning down tip money for doing a good job. But until we do something to end our current post-capitalist nightmare and stop letting US employers siphon money away from their workers, US employees are going to gratefully keep whatever tips they are lucky enough to receive.

If US employers think it is important for “customer service to be part of the job”, then the compensation their employees receive should reflect that. If they pay shit wages with no benefits, then they clearly do not value their customers or their employees, only their profit margins.

2

u/new2bay Jan 15 '22

In Japan? Yeah, I’ve heard of people literally chasing down foreigners who don’t understand you’re not supposed to tip in Japan.

→ More replies
→ More replies

2

u/profanedic Jan 15 '22

They also might try to keep you for paying for a taxi fair that you should pay.

Had a driver try to take us to a place we found online that was 20 minutes away in the country. He spent a good 15-20 minutes trying to find the location amd couldn't (looks like the place shut down) with the meter off. Then drove us all the way back, another 20 minutes. So about an hour with us and he didn't wamt to take our money. We kind of forced it on him, it wasm't his fault the place wasn't there and he did drive us all the way amd back.

Hope he wasn't too offended, but he did provide his service.

2

u/Butt_Sex_And_Tacos Jan 15 '22

They are offended if you tip money, but not by gifts. Gifting is the best way to show appreciation for services in Japan. Small things, like I would always bring some custom made jerky from a meat store and wrap it neatly in butcher’s paper and tie with twine. Talking small enough to fit in your hand. Never had anyone get offended by that, and had several people compliment it the next time I saw them if I happened to go to the same place again.

2

u/tazbaron1981 Jan 15 '22

Same in Switzerland and France

→ More replies

629

u/Secondary123098 Jan 15 '22 Ally

Tipping should be everywhere! Surgeon operated early, tip! Politician passed that law you wanted, bonus! Teacher gave your child an A, have a little cash.

Tips are called bribes in any area of employment where the employees are not horrifically mistreated and underpaid. They have no place in a civilized culture.

175

u/crocrux Jan 15 '22

even Walmart employees can't accept tips

191

u/Ehcksit Jan 15 '22

I worked grocery and we weren't allowed to accept tips. An old lady knew that and dragged me to the back of the store to shake my hand and pass off a folded $5 bill like we were breaking the law or something.

46

u/Tribblehappy Jan 15 '22

Had a customer offer me $20 back when I was young working at a pet store (I think I helped her with her birds? Maybe? It was 2001). I told her repeatedly I couldn't accept it, so she dropped it, said "oops!" And left.

9

u/workshardanddies Jan 15 '22

I did this at a grocery store at the beginning of the pandemic. Wanted to tip the cashier and the person who bagged my groceries. Was told that they couldn't accept it, so I just dropped two twenty dollar bills on the counter and left.

→ More replies

20

u/Murameowsa Jan 15 '22

Yep, my coworkers who helped little old ladies put their cat litter in the trunk would get a tip slipped into their front shirt pocket like in the movies when someone bribes a guard to look the other way while they rob the casino.

47

u/labellavita1985 Jan 15 '22

I love this story.

19

u/Few-Swordfish-6722 Jan 15 '22

Me to. I pictured that clearly. Lol

7

u/susetchka Jan 15 '22

I work grocery also. A lady said, "Take the damn money." Lol 😂

25

u/thejackruark Jan 15 '22

dragged me to the back of the store to shake my hand and pass off a folded $5 bill like we were breaking the law

Old ladies are just the most precious. I think that's why we loved Betty White so much, she was America's old lady

6

u/crocrux Jan 15 '22

this has also happened to me but on a register, I was so worried all day someone would come pull me off but it never happened. I have a feeling most managers don't give a flying fuck unless they directly see you accepting it

3

u/MixAdventurous6222 Jan 15 '22

my nana does that too so my mom doesn't know

3

u/starfreeek Jan 15 '22

I had an old guy do that to me when I used to work at circuit City as a tech. He brought his laptop in on 2 separate occasions to have it worked on and I couldn't in good conscious intake it because there wasn't an actual problem to fix, he just didn't know what to do(like it took me less than 30 seconds each time to get him rolling again). The second time he took me out the parking lot and gave me something.

3

u/CaptainMisha12 Jan 15 '22

Aw, that's so sweet.

5

u/34TM3138 Jan 15 '22

When I was 16 and worked as a bag boy at a grocery in the DC area, an "older" lady (she was probably in her 40s) would always have myself or this one other bag boy help her with her groceries, and we always got nice generous tips clandestinely shoved very deeply down into our pockets, lol.

And yes, as an adult I now know that is creepy...but that lady paid for a lot of my weed and gave me a lot of good dreams, so I can't be too salty about it.

→ More replies

2

u/Cloberella Jan 15 '22

I used to work at a Nursing Home, and the families of residents and residents would want to tip me or give me gifts all the time, but I wasn't allowed to accept them. One lady used to sneak up behind me and drop trinkets into the pockets of my cardigan, and then I'd have to sneak back into her apartment when she was at an activity and put the items back.

On my last day families (of residents, I never accepted gifts from the residents themselves because many had Dementia) gave me large amounts of cash gifts and other things. I was advised if I ever planned on returning to the facility to not accept the gifts or hide them and be very hush-hush about it.

I didn't plan on returning, and enjoyed my gifts and thanked everyone appropriately.

→ More replies

51

u/kingofducs Jan 15 '22

But Walmart loves when they have to accept food stamps

47

u/talino2321 Jan 15 '22

Don't they actually show new hires how to apply for SNAP as part of their new hire training?

5

u/BankshotMcG Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 16 '22

While scheduling them at 39.5 hours a week.

3

u/Loki_61089 Jan 15 '22

and then cutting your hours the week before you'd be up for review for Full-Time Benefits, so they don't have to give you Full-Time Benefits.

Was a victim of that more than once.

→ More replies

41

u/fluppuppy Jan 15 '22

Walmart will fire you over $1

69

u/OneMillionSchwifties Jan 15 '22

Walmart will fire you for eating unopened, but expired beef jerky from the dumpster. They'll even wait a whole year to bring it up and fire you over it.

19

u/Tribblehappy Jan 15 '22

I worked at a PetSmart. Sometimes aquariums arrived broken, and we would salvage usable items (starter kits would have filters etc). A coworker took some sample packs of bacterial starter and was fired. For taking samples ... Which came from written off product.

16

u/TatsuandFlorian Jan 15 '22

I used to work at petsmart. I never got sacked for it but the things from work we took home were the animals too old to be sold when people brought them back.

→ More replies

2

u/Cloberella Jan 15 '22

I worked at a Sally's Beauty Supply and they would make us "damage out" and "destroy" (put in the dumpster) any returned product. Makes sense for things like make-up, but sometimes a beard trimmer or a flat iron would get returned in working condition but due to health and safety regulations would be considered damaged and have to be tossed.

My boss was cool and hated waste, so when that happened she would just put them in a little box next to the dumpster and employees could drive around back on their way home and pick out what they wanted before the rest got tossed.

29

u/coffylover Jan 15 '22

Specific and awful :(

16

u/CreatedSole Jan 15 '22

Fucking scum. When I worked at tim hortons I saw people get fired over eating a 16cent timbit because they were starving. It's a literal crumb to the company and is worth termination of their employment. I despise these companies that put profit before everything and everyone and look for any excuse they can to fire you if they don't like you for any reason.

18

u/OneMillionSchwifties Jan 15 '22

Stuff like this is exactly why there's a push to leave the food service, warehouse, and factory based industries and enter the corporate office for most Americans. Most factory and food staff even act as their own cleaning staff. When's the last time you saw Mark in accounting push a mop or even clean the coffee maker tho?

→ More replies

3

u/Rhyobit Jan 15 '22

16 cents when it's bought, fraction of that in cost to Tim Hortons.

→ More replies

16

u/OneMillionSchwifties Jan 15 '22

I had a friend who worked the register there for maybe like 3 months. One day, he decided it was his last day and decided to only scan like, maybe 1 out of every 5 items? Ended up giving away a bunch of free shit to random strangers and getting fired by the end of the day. They were PISSED.

2

u/fluppuppy Jan 15 '22

That sounds amazing though

2

u/RedPandaInFlight Jan 15 '22

It's also theft. If they didn't call the cops, he got off lucky.

→ More replies
→ More replies

143

u/Rodaris Jan 15 '22

To be fair wallmart does not want their slaves to have a chance at advancing their lives.

→ More replies

7

u/ThatOneGuy1294 Jan 15 '22

Same for Safeway/Albertsons employees

3

u/Mashed_Potato2 Jan 15 '22

Oh but we do. We'll atleast I do in my supermarket. We are t supposed to either but if I help a lady bring heavy shit to her car and she gives me 5 bucks I'm not gonna say no to that obviously.

95

u/beforeitcloy Jan 15 '22

To be fair, that actually is how it works with politicians.

74

u/elppaenip Jan 15 '22

Yeah, except they're not called bribes they're called lobbying

57

u/LA-Matt Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 15 '22

The Supreme Court calls it “free speech.”

But it (lobbying) is just legalized bribery.

Edited to clarify for anyone who can’t follow a thread.

12

u/elppaenip Jan 15 '22

Being paid to do one job while someone else pays you to fuck it up

→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/BeefmasterSex Jan 15 '22

Let’s take it a step further. Money has no place in a civilized culture.

10

u/katieoffloatsmoke Anarcha-Feminist Jan 15 '22

I’m not sure teacher fits into your metaphor for not being horrifically treated and underpaid, but yes to everything else 100%

21

u/Secondary123098 Jan 15 '22

Yes, any amount of time browsing r/teachers will leave any reasonable person depressed.

→ More replies
→ More replies

2

u/wulder Jan 15 '22

This is reality if you got enough money

2

u/Renovatio_ Jan 15 '22

Politician passed that law you wanted, bonus!

Uh, that already happens. Corporate lobbyists reward their best stooges.

→ More replies

32

u/crio2201 Jan 15 '22

No, tips are actually fucked up in every part of the world

Yes, places outside of the US are not as horrible, but everywhere that has tips actually underpays their employees because of it

5

u/CreatedSole Jan 15 '22

Yeah because these scumbag corporations use tips to justify underpaying their workers. Then, they literally shaft the onus of providing a living wage onto the consumer who is also already paying a (usually inflated) premium for their food. And then on top of that they were able to dupe people into defending tipping via pariah propaganda.

You know the ones... "YoU"rE BrOkE iF YoU DoNt TiP, YoU GoTtA TiP AsShOlE". No I'm not, and no I don't. I'm already paying out the ass and now I have to pay MORE because their boss and company don't want to pay them? How tf does that make sense??

Companies utilized this "guilt trip" "you're a bad person" propaganda to latently reinforce tipping as a social construct, allowing them to get away with not paying wages, charging the customer more AND raking in even more profit via not paying proper wages. It's so sinister when you actually look at tipping for what it is.

3

u/aphrahannah Jan 15 '22

I got a thoroughly decent wage and tips at one of my jobs. Could they have paid more? Probably. But they paid way more than similar jobs. They didn't plan to have tips, but it turns out that rich people wanted to give us money... so we took it!

They also sent us home with very fancy leftovers.

I just realised this sub may lynch me for saying such things.

→ More replies

2

u/reeeekin Jan 15 '22

See: food delivery drivers. At least in Poland, it became an usual practice when looking for employees, to say the wage is X/hour + tips, resulting in the X being smaller cause they believe people tip so Well. But thats not exactly true in Poland. I was a food delivery for 2,5 years, delivering sushi and some asian cuisine (and sushi was considered an expensive thing back then), so not the cheapest kind of takeaway. I was doing my job good, was fast, organised, handled the pressure at rush hours etc. The biggest tip I got during those 2 years was like 1,5x my hourly rate, so basically, and it happened maybe like 5 times total. Most of the tips were like the small little change, for example customer has to pay 48,50, handles the 50 and with great pride says keep the change. Why thank you, I can buy a can of coca cola for that. Smh, liked the job, but glad I left food bussiness

9

u/Alastor_Hawking Jan 15 '22

I think the issue is that tipping has nothing to do with the service you provide, and everything to do with who the tipper is as a person. Women and minorities in the service industry have to put up with awful racist, sexist people, because they rely on those tips. I do think we should eliminate tipping as a culture and tipping wages as a law, as it only exists to take power away from marginalized groups.

3

u/JaggedTheDark 'merica, oh no! Jan 15 '22

I remember hearing about how tipping in certain Asian countries is considered rude and an insult, as it makes it seem like the person you're tipping has to depend on the people, and can not fend for themselves, or something along those lines.

Don't qoute me on that though, I probably heard this like five years ago. that, or my brain is just making shit up at this point. too tired to double check.

→ More replies

3

u/hedgybaby Jan 15 '22

I went to Japan in 2018 and it was so nice to never feel the pressure to need to tip as it’s not really socially acceptable there.

3

u/gojirra Jan 15 '22

And the ironic thing is the service and quality of food in Japan is amazing.

3

u/lone_Ghatak Jan 15 '22

I think you mean Mandatory tipping. Optional tipping should be welcome.

→ More replies

3

u/Altermatego Jan 15 '22

From what I understand the American pay/tip system is a joke, I hope you guys fix it.

American restaurants (E.g. TGIF) in Australia getting paid our way (liveable wage / no tips) still ask for tips… ah no thanks not after paying $80AU for 2 burgers and soda.

It’s the employers job, to pay employees, not the customers.

→ More replies

4

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

It seems like servers would make more through tips than an hourly wage. I worked at a Restaurant where they would make 300 per night easy

It’s a crazy system to have customers pay the workers

2

u/xyameax Jan 15 '22

Personally, tips shouldn't be illegal. What should be are the countless states that pay less than minimum wage because "tips will help compensate". Washington State, it's minimum wage across the board.

2

u/walnoter Jan 15 '22

Tipping shouldn't be illegal but lowering someone's wage in expectation that they will get tips should

2

u/Noelle_Xandria Jan 15 '22

Agreed. When I worked in rook service, we put up with sexual assault since we couldn’t afford to take the time out at $2.13/hr to file complaints. There was no dignity in feeling like I was mentally begging.

2

u/BushyOreo Jan 15 '22

Yup agreed. I'm glad the general sentiment has shifted to this now a days. When I use to say these talking points 10 years ago, I was treated like I was Jeff bezos stripping my factory workers of toilets and handing them bottles

→ More replies

2

u/cksc51 Jan 15 '22

I agree, I tip well and it makes me feel like shit most of the time. Usually the person is so thankful, just because I feel like their time is worth more than a pittance. So here I am supporting a system that helps keep these people's wages low, but I can't stop because I know these people rely on the tips. I'm not in the restaurant industry now but I have been. Many in my family still are. Even then I gave someone a $25 tip around the holidays this year. For the service and occasion I would have usually tried to go for like $50+ to make someone's holiday a bit better but I did what I could this year. It was a GrubHub driver and they told me it was the highest tip they'd ever got. It was the day after Christmas and they said they worked Christmas Eve. 🤬

2

u/notislant Jan 15 '22

I've hated tipping since I was 12 or something, it always seemed INCREDIBLY stupid and pointless. People are literally paying 20% extra for their food. Some restaurants started paying 18-20/hr and it only cost them $1-2 extra a dish. Better for the customer and the worker.

→ More replies

3

u/Kagyu13 Jan 15 '22

Where I live I will say southeast Texas it actually is on the employer. If their employee doesn't make enough in tips to meet minimum wage the employer has to pay that difference. Unfortunately that law isn't talked about much here and the 16-20 year olds don't know about it so that is just free labor.

5

u/goo_goo_gajoob Jan 15 '22

Yea but your still an asshole if you eat out and don't tip. The boss being a bigger one doesn't absolve you.

→ More replies

2

u/idintfuckingcare Jan 15 '22

I agree it should be like that but since it isn’t does that mean you don’t tip?

3

u/AdamovitsM Jan 15 '22

Never have tipped and absolutely never will. Tips are rarely given out here in Denmark and our system has no issues when it comes to that as everyone is paid a wage which you can actually live off of. Even McDonalds workers, waiters, etc.

I was actually baffled when I went to San Francisco and chose to eat out. There was an actual mandatory “tip tax” on the receipt. It was also absolutely ridiculous that I never actually knew the price of the product before having to pay as all the tax was added afterwards...

→ More replies

2

u/wfamily Jan 15 '22

The tipping system really confused me first time i went to America.

But the only guy i tipped was a hobo for trying to sell me weed and told me an interesting story instead.

I had never seen a real homeless person before so it was worth it.

I really hope he spent it on drugs or booze.

→ More replies