r/antiwork Jan 14 '22 Silver 5 Helpful 16 Wholesome 10

So sorry, I'm broke so I can only pay you $77 for my food. You were great though.

Post image
30.2k Upvotes

View all comments

15.0k

u/Shruikathemonk Jan 14 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Wholesome Starry

American tipping culture is a cancer.

2.9k

u/PattyIce32 Jan 15 '22

It only works when things are going well. Times of struggle its borderline indentured servitude level pay

199

u/MudLOA Jan 15 '22

You should have read a similar post a few days ago. People were posting about how great it was making so much money from tips and I’m sure a lot of them were also not reporting income tax on it. It’s just all about the cash in the pocket and who cares about not having sick days or insurance.

95

u/captainjack361 Jan 15 '22

My sister is a lifelong waitress and I be watching her blow money so fast. She's damn good at her job, but the industry is up and down, not consistent, etc and she doesn't prepare for the hard times

Some nights she will literally come home with like 7 to 900 dollars that she made in one night, other times she won't even make 50 bucks in a day. But what does she do when she has those 700 dollar nights, she blows it very fast

70

u/tandyman8360 lazy and proud Jan 15 '22

This is like the conversation on the first page of "Waiter Rant." An income that's not steady can make it difficult for people to get a good understanding of their financial obligations in relation to their money. It's a tough thing because even if you save, it feels like a huge expense is always there to wipe it out.

33

u/stealthgerbil Jan 15 '22

If your income isn't reliable you gotta live like you are going to be making the lower end of the spread. That way you can save up cash for the bad times. Shit happens so much I just expect it now.

2

u/James-SF Jan 15 '22

Fair enough but it's also true for many self-employed and contractors.

Anyone can spend 10 mins writing down expenses and making a mini budget. Shame this isn't driven into people in the classroom

38

u/Wiggy_Bop Jan 15 '22

This is the story of everyone who works in the service industry. Some are very disciplined with their money, paying their taxes quarterly, saving for a rainy day. I admire them, I truly do. But so many people in the SI get into that party lifestyle, get strung out on blow and/or seriously alcoholic. They wake up one day at 40 and wonder where the time went.

3

u/_NoBoXiNgNoLiFe_ Jan 15 '22

Could you actually BE any more arrogant and condescending?! * jesus christ almighty. ..

0

u/[deleted] Jan 19 '22

Arrogant and condescending? Sorry the truth hurts.

4

u/captainjack361 Jan 15 '22

The crazy thing is. And I love my sister to death....but she'll go out after work, drink and party all night, come home like at 4am and be up early in the morning to go back to work.

I be shocked how she's able to do that but she does it. She works her fucking ass off and i admire it so much but she is atrocious when it comes to her money. She's older than me already in her 30s and she's been like this for as long as I can remember

10

u/Wiggy_Bop Jan 15 '22

I’m sorry, but your sis sounds just like me when I had a big cocaine problem. I wasn’t in the SI, but a lot of my pals were. I wish I had all the money I spent on my vices back.

If I were you, I’d have a talk with her. Catch her on a Monday morning, if you can. She will be completely serotonin depleted and will tell you everything. She probably wants off the merry go round, anyway. Be prepared for her to need a ton of support. Good luck.

2

u/Bitesize777 Jan 15 '22

Easy come, easy go! I worked in the industry for years. It sux

46

u/PuzzleheadedRepeat41 Jan 15 '22

I lived with my brother in my early 20s. He was a waiter. I made minimum wage, no tips, although I both was a hostess and bussed tables. A few years later, the waiters and bus boys shared some tips with the women hostesses

I couldn’t believe how much the waiters made! And they would spend it all that night at bars. And they would complain they were always so broke. When I finally made a little money, I made sure I didn’t spend it at bars.

17

u/captainjack361 Jan 15 '22

Yep....when she has one of those good nights she goes straight out to party with her other coworkers who also had good nights and they come home with almost nothing

3

u/Bitesize777 Jan 15 '22

Smart you are!!

-2

u/Renhoek2099 Jan 15 '22

You don't know what you're missing

4

u/MsAntrophie Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 17 '22

What, like* a quality standard of living?

2

u/PuzzleheadedRepeat41 Jan 15 '22

At least I’m not missing my money.

1

u/Renhoek2099 Jan 15 '22

It's not missing if you got something in return

0

u/PuzzleheadedRepeat41 Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 15 '22

Sure! But I still had fun my own way and got to keep my money. You can still have friends and fun without spending all the money you made that day on beer for your “friends”, some of whom you won’t even see the next year. I don’t need liquor to have fun, but sure, If that’s what floats your boat, go for it.

I really liked my older waiter friends, but unfortunately, they didn’t age well. It’s hard to keep up that lifestyle in your 50s, they never saved anything, most of them, and now they are still working, disabled, in their 70s. So — I don’t think I’m missing anything. I do feel bad for them though. I really liked them.

1

u/PuzzleheadedRepeat41 Jan 15 '22

I did miss out — what on not being poor or broke in my 30s and beyond? And though not being rich, at least being stable?

4

u/Nwolfe Jan 15 '22

$700-$900 in a night? Are you sure she’s not a stripper?

5

u/captainjack361 Jan 15 '22

She works at a higher end restaurant in houston. I didn't believe it either until I saw it.

3

u/MetsFan113 Jan 15 '22

That's easy in a high end - well trafficked restaurant in nyc...

1

u/Nwolfe Jan 15 '22

Really though? I’ve worked in NYC my whole life and even at extremely high end restaurants the average was around $450 a night. $700 per night is astronomical.

3

u/WholesomeYungKing Jan 15 '22

Strippers earn more lol

2

u/averyfinename Jan 15 '22

all it takes is a couple really good tables, and not fill the rest of the night with 'broke' guys that can still pay $80 for lunch.

1

u/MuggsIsDead Jan 15 '22

When I was a casino cage operator in California, it wasn't unusual for staff to cash-in more than $1000 in tipped markers/chips.

They weren't even dealers, they were bar staff.

1

u/PrizePriority4372 Jan 15 '22

This is very common. I've worked at two not even fine dining restaurants in Oregon. The servers get something like a 600$ check and usually clean house when it's busy. When it's slow they leave but an avg night is at least 300$ bare minimum. I've seen them walk out with Gs when they get their tip envelope back.

2

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

Part of the problem is people have an ingrained spending mentality like your sister. I don't know if it's the constant barrage of advertising we're exposed to or what. Human beings aren't stupid compared to 100 years ago, but they will have $30 to their name and use it to order Doordash. I wish I understood the psychology behind that.

2

u/Hardinyoung Jan 15 '22

Cocaine one helluva drug

1

u/SassCunt420 Jan 15 '22

Why would you waste a life waiting tables?

2

u/captainjack361 Jan 15 '22

Why would anyone waste a life working anywhere.

1

u/monogamish306 Jan 15 '22

Username checks out.

Some folks are natural people persons who are good at making others feel comfortable. Service as a rule isn't for everyone, but some folks are born to it. For those, waiting tables or tending bar can be one of the more lucrative options. Moreover, there is a strong sense of comradery among the best crews.

Think of it like this: if you're a natural people person, service is a job where you can be surrounded by your kindred; sure, the customers come and go, but the folks you work with are often what makes the job great.

Find something you love doing, and spend your life doing it well, whatever that means to you. Sassy c-u-next-Tuesdays need not approve ...