r/antiwork Jan 14 '22 Silver 5 Helpful 16 Wholesome 10

So sorry, I'm broke so I can only pay you $77 for my food. You were great though.

Post image
30.2k Upvotes

View all comments

Show parent comments

780

u/DanTheRocketeer Jan 15 '22

Tipping shouldn’t be illegal, it should be bonus. That’s how it’s is pretty much everywhere other than the US - the servers get paid a living wage and if they get tipped it’s either theirs to keep or split amongst all the servers (the former being the better system).

627

u/Secondary123098 Jan 15 '22 Ally

Tipping should be everywhere! Surgeon operated early, tip! Politician passed that law you wanted, bonus! Teacher gave your child an A, have a little cash.

Tips are called bribes in any area of employment where the employees are not horrifically mistreated and underpaid. They have no place in a civilized culture.

171

u/crocrux Jan 15 '22

even Walmart employees can't accept tips

144

u/Rodaris Jan 15 '22

To be fair wallmart does not want their slaves to have a chance at advancing their lives.

-11

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

[deleted]

9

u/Insusurro Jan 15 '22

The company had a net profit of 13.5 billion last year. They can easily pay their employees more. They choose not to.

1

u/wavytiger Apr 17 '22

yep, #17, #18 and #19 richest people on earth are the Walton heirs and they own only about half of Walmart stock

5

u/circularstars Jan 15 '22

Sounds like a bad business model to me. Also, the reason why they have so many employees? Part-time employees that get 10 hours a week. When I worked there we had so many wonderful staff that wanted full-time positions or even just more hours each week to help pay the bills. I was told by one of the managers that Walmart wants a ton of employees that only get given a couple hours a week. That way when there’s an opening shift (someone is sick, quits, etc.) they’ll have plenty of people desperate enough to grab it on the spot.

2

u/averyfinename Jan 15 '22

exactly, and if nobody except the gm and department heads are full time, far less to pay out in insurance and other benefits.

-5

u/SecretDevilsAdvocate Jan 15 '22

I don’t think you did the math right…how does 20 million become 2.2 million * 600? And I don’t think that’s reasonable for the ceo to give away all his earnings…

-1

u/Josh121199 Jan 15 '22

Who’s wallmart?