r/antiwork Jan 14 '22 Silver 5 Helpful 16 Wholesome 10

So sorry, I'm broke so I can only pay you $77 for my food. You were great though.

Post image
30.2k Upvotes

View all comments

Show parent comments

904

u/Kind_Man_0 Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 15 '22

Saves A LOT of them.

Typical paycheck for a full time waitress is about $60 or so. Let's run the math from dinner rush to close.

That is $12 for a full night's wages, Given that the cook making the meals gets paid about $14/hr that puts us at $84, so $96 for the pair of them

One waitress where I worked could have waited about 70 tables til close,

I wasn't in charge of food purchasing, but a typical meal for 4 was simple; most sides were ready made for the night, only entrees were consistently cooked to order. So at roughly $30 dollars for a table of 2, we will run that at 2.5 per table to account for larger groups. Over the course of the rush, we could serve about 300 tables in a night BUT we will consider only that one waitress and cook for this math. At $30 per table, your restaurant made $2100 off the labor of those two employee

Takes out food costs, which is about 1/4 of it, you just made a profit $1479

Pay our hardworking wait staff what the deserve in this country.

YES, I know I am not calculating in rent and other restaurant expenses. I am making a point of how the backbone of a functioning restaurant earns the lowest overhead cost.

Let me add to this a second time since some people are mad at me for not considering the other expenses.

I laid down the basic math for how much money can be made during a 6 hour shift from 5-11. This is not how much profit you are making, this is REVENUE GENERATED per employee.

Yes, if I wait tables and I go in for 6 hours, bust out 60 tables at $5 a piece, that is decent income. But it doesn't happen every night. And you don't go home right after the restaurant closes.

Most restaurants are going to have you helping shut down after close for $2.13/hr and there are no customers to tip you.

372

u/Cerael Jan 15 '22

I like where the cooks make 14 flat and are doing more labor.

I didn't say servers don't work hard but the work required to cook that much often goes unappreciated in these posts.

Let's include all restaurant workers. Corporate spots don't tip cooks ever

57

u/Abbaddonhope Jan 15 '22

Can’t they just pay everyone involved more

47

u/Lonely_Animator4557 Jan 15 '22

They could but that could decrease profits and decrease stock value which would anger the investors and cause them to switch cfo or ceo or some other multi million dollar position which they can’t

36

u/threeleggedgirl Jan 15 '22

Most restaurants aren't publicly traded and have no obligation to stock holders. It's purely the restaurant owner being a greedy sociopath most of the time lmao

8

u/Lonely_Animator4557 Jan 15 '22

Still feeds into the point that the people in charge of the company are looking out for themselves Publicly traded companies take this a step further by shifting blame away from the money hoarding c level execs to the “stock holders” which in the USA something like 10% of the population owns 90% of the stock market

3

u/goldenopal42 Jan 15 '22

They’re usually working with some kind of borrowed/invested money though. If only for accounting purposes. That money will move to a different industry where the employees can be exploited better.

Sad fact of American capitalism is the best way to ensure your service person gets paid enough to continue to perform the service you want is to give them the money directly.

I am not saying it’s a great system, but I don’t understand why people are so put off by it either.

I don’t want to pay you. The one I am interacting with. The one here actually doing the work for me. I want to pay your boss and let him figure out what you should earn.

Why? I don’t get it.

1

u/threeleggedgirl Jan 16 '22

“I don’t want to pay you. The one I am interacting with. The one here actually doing the work for me. I want to pay your boss and let him figure out what you should earn.”

Why? I don’t get it.

Well, on its own, I can see why one wouldn't trust their boss with money that would otherwise be handed directly to workers via tips. But now imagine a unionized restaurant with high base wages for servers. Isn't that the ultimate goal with an antiwork movement? Unions, higher base wages, income stability and protections? Without tipped wages, your income becomes dependent on the number of hours you put in and not how lucky you get with your tables (which makes it more stable), you're incentivized to pick up the slack for your coworkers if they're struggling or overwhelmed, and the consumer can more accurately gage how much their dinner will cost them.

Realistically, servers should be paid a base wage alongside a union-negotiated quarterly profit sharing that is outlined very carefully in a contract.

9

u/Abbaddonhope Jan 15 '22

Yeah treating your workers like their people decreases stock value

12

u/Cerael Jan 15 '22

Cmon lad chin up, that’s what this whole movement is about.

2

u/marker_dinova Jan 15 '22

It goes much further than that. Sometimes we talk about “investors” like a round table of Illuminati shrouded in shadows. But the reality is that if we own 401Ks, IRAs, any index fund, or even some Insurance products, we are have a seat at that round table. If we don’t see that graph pointing upwards for a few quarters/years, we’re calling up our financial advisers. Sometimes it’s even automated. Our entire economy is based on forcing every business to grow continually. When they can’t do it organically they’ll do it any way possible: reduce quality and/or screw their employees. It’s unsustainable because infinite growth doesn’t exist.

1

u/NumerousHelicopter6 Jan 15 '22

🤣🤣🤣 decrease the stock value.....as if all restaurants are corporate

It wouldn't decrease profits it would most likely increase them. Think about it if you force the restaurant to pay $20 an hour and the restaurant averages forty $12 burgers an hour, they do this with two servers both with 4 table sections and they were paying them $4 per hour. So that's an increase of $16 per hour X 2 = $32. Now that the owner has to come up with an additional $32 an hour just to maintain, do you think he adds a dollar to the burger, or do you think he only marks up the exact amount to cover the expense? We both know what happens here whether we agree with it or not.

4

u/machen2307 Jan 15 '22

Lol big olive garden would like to have a word

2

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

[deleted]

1

u/NumerousHelicopter6 Jan 15 '22

Again this isn't a 1 restaurant thing if the government says they all have to pay it makes it much easier for them all to add a buck.

What makes you think restaurants don't raise prices whenever needed? Have you ordered chicken wings in the last 6 months?

The mistake most restaurants make when they need to increase profits is cutting. They cut down on staff and they also cut down on the quality of the product. This almost always ends up in a shitty restaurant.

1

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

[deleted]

1

u/NumerousHelicopter6 Jan 15 '22

If it were that easy for restaurants to just "increase profit" what in the world makes you think they wouldn't already be doing it?

This is what I was referring to

1

u/[deleted] Jan 16 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies

1

u/Abbaddonhope Jan 15 '22

It’s more likely he gets rid of a server then slowly lose money over time. Marking up the food would make people less likely to eat there

1

u/NumerousHelicopter6 Jan 15 '22

It would be both, remember it's not just one restaurant that would be forced to pay, they all would have to. You could make the argument that some would decrease the portion size to make up the difference. In some cases that wouldn't be a bad thing.

1

u/Abbaddonhope Jan 15 '22

Yeah. So I consider most restaurants portions disproportionate in comparison to the price

1

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 19 '22

[deleted]

2

u/vaguecentaur Jan 15 '22

Come on. Just think about your own figures for a minute. 0.5 million restaurant is not serving a population base of 330~million. Especially of you've ever been to a small town. Virtually every town over 1000 has one small diner/restaurant not counting the subway or McDonald's that's also in the same town.

1

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 19 '22

[deleted]

1

u/vaguecentaur Jan 15 '22

Huh, well turns out I'm wrong on this one. To be honest I did no actual math just seemed like 500, 000 seemed really low. And then I estimated based on my own anecdotal experiences. After reading your source I have to say you are right on this one. Still sounds low though. I suppose, since those stats are from 2018 the numbers are even lower now.

1

u/inversewd2 Jan 16 '22

It would mean the CEO can't buy his third yacht this year