r/funny Oct 05 '22

Reducing plastic waste is very important

Post image
4.8k Upvotes

u/AutoModerator Oct 05 '22

This is a friendly reminder to read our rules.

Memes, social media, hate-speech, and pornography are not allowed.

Screenshots of Reddit are expressly forbidden, as are TikTok videos.

Comics may only be posted on Wednesdays and Sundays.

Rule-breaking posts may result in bans.

Please also be wary of spam.


I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

254

u/snipeceli Oct 05 '22

Tbf I only buy smart water when I want a reusable water bottle and forget to pack one of the many I have

103

u/Scary_Princess Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

I’m glad I’m not the only one who does this. I also prefer smart water bottles because they are thick enough they stand up to multiple uses. Tried telling someone about this ie reduce/reuse part of the three R’s and they were shocked because of how “unsanitary” it was, meanwhile I don’t think they’ve ever washed their Nalgene bottle.

37

u/Painless-Amidaru Oct 06 '22

Hey, fellow Smart Water bottle fans. I never buy bottled water, but I DO buy one smart water and if I ever lose the bottle, I buy another one. They are heavy duty, they don't crinkle or start looking like shit even after using the same one for months. They are heavy-duty bottles! Costs what, $1.50 or so?

5

u/nameouschangey Oct 06 '22

You guys need to go visit /r/hydrohomies

I think you'll be quite at home

4

u/Tagous Oct 06 '22

Their slim long bottle is amazing for camping. You can slide them in and out of your backpack with ease

6

u/ricecakegorl Oct 06 '22

I didn’t know other people did this too!!

→ More replies

16

u/Revo_Veneno Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Dumb people buy smart water for the water (and that's how the company wants you to buy those). Smart people buy smart water for its stupidly overpackaged bottle that uses probably 10 times more plastics than it need. You just need to realize that it's simply a reusable water container with prepackaged water inside it.

Buy once, and never again. That's the way

1

u/cappie Oct 06 '22

only use hard, BPA-free plastic drinking bottles like doppr or metal ones (lttstore.com).. endocrine disruptors are a thing..

7

u/Sparrowbuck Oct 06 '22

BPA substitutes are also problematic. I use a Nalgene because frankly idgaf but the idea that a bpa free label means it’s hunky dory is just marketing.

5

u/cappie Oct 06 '22

I only drink from glass or stainless steel these days, so I wouldn't know.. can recommend it

→ More replies

-9

u/Leiryn Oct 06 '22

You shouldn't refill plastic bottles because it can leak contaminants into the water

21

u/snipeceli Oct 06 '22

I apriciate the heads up, but on the list of unhealthy stuff that has entered my body those contaminants are pretty low on the list.

Will try to be more cognisant though

12

u/Idivkemqoxurceke Oct 06 '22

Source? Like, if there was water in it before, why can’t I put water back in it?

5

u/This-Salt-2754 Oct 06 '22

Because the plastic begins to deteriorate and leak into the water, especially with tap water that tends to stray away from normal ph levels

5

u/Illusi Oct 06 '22

This is a myth, or more accurately, a misinterpreted result from some research done most recently in 2012. See https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2012/EM/c2em10917d

The deterioration of plastic happens regardless of whether the water inside of the bottle is replaced or not. So the plastic bottles that have sat unopened in the corner store for the past half year have more contaminants in them than the one you're using every week for your exercise, simply by virtue of not replacing the water every week.

And furthermore, this degradation happens with re-useable water bottles as well. In some cases the re-useable ones are worse for you because their plastic contains pigments, which are far more dangerous to your body than a bit of PET (depending on the colour of pigment).

The most healthy water containers are made out of ceramics or treated metals. Ceramics are hard to seal securely enough to store in a bag, but metals may be an option (like a thermos). If that's not an option, go with a hard plastic PET bottle, one that won't crease with use. Because more dangerous still than all the plastics are internal scratches and creases in the bottle where bacteria can build up to contaminate your water.

→ More replies

6

u/SophisticPenguin Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

This is only an issue if you're routinely washing them out especially with hot water. Refilling a couple times throughout a day isn't going to be an issue

2

u/This-Salt-2754 Oct 06 '22

Why are you being downvoted? Plastic bottles are not meant to be refilled. After multiple refills, micro plastics start leaking into the water and can lead to a host of health problems. Ppl! Do not refill plastic bottles more than 2-3 times, and DO NOT keep them for refills more than a week! If they were meant to be refilled, they would be cleaned and reused. It is hazardous to your health to do that.

5

u/CupcakeValkyrie Oct 06 '22

Two things: First, SmartWater bottles (and most other bottles) are made out of the exact same formulation of plastic that reusable plastic sports bottles are. The actual microplastic exposure comes from repeatedly screwing the cap on and off.

Second, there's no evidence that consuming small traces of microplastics is hazardous, so you can say it could potentially be harmful, but as of yet there's no evidence that trace tiny amounts you get from reusing a plastic water bottle are going to seriously threaten your health, which is why the World Health Organization is pushing so hard for more studies into the impact they have on health.

The only real health risk - and this goes for any PET bottle, reusable or not - is that you need to rinse it out if it gets really hot with water in it because it can leech antimony into the water, though the actual amount from a single bottle isn't likely to be harmful.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

354

u/NoBicepz Oct 05 '22

So because some people might find it interesting, in Europe, in my case in Germany, plastic bags are banned everywhere and replaced with recycling paper bags. Bottles and cans have "pfand" which is kind of a deposit - you have to pay 0.25€ for every plastic bottle and can (like a coke can, not canned food), 0.07€ extra for each glass bottle you purchase and you get that money back when you return it to any store.

A lot of poor people can afford their daily food by just grabbing bottles in parks and in bins and returning them to stores

Plastic cuttlery and straws are banned aswell and replaced by wooden cutlery to go and paper straws

95

u/fredlllll Oct 05 '22

we must be in different germanys, cause when i go to kaufland i still put my produce in those super thin plastic bags from a big roll... although i then use them as waste bags for my other plastic garbage, so at least i upcycle them?

67

u/NoBicepz Oct 05 '22

I am a fat fuck that never buys vegetables or fruits so i can only complain about chips being packed in plastic bags

11

u/lakshmananlm Oct 06 '22

As a skinny hypertensive fuck, I do the same. Cheers

→ More replies

11

u/bjlwasabi Oct 06 '22

Why not put them (produce) into a reusable bag? I usually carry about 5 reusable bags. Two for produce, and 3 for other groceries.

→ More replies

4

u/TheSackLunchBunch Oct 06 '22

I got two decent quality giant canvas bags (from Aldi in the U.S.) and keep them in my car. It is the one thing I allow myself to high-horse about.

But genuinely I feel like I handle less material because two giant canvas bags hold like 4 thin plastic bags worth of groceries each. And for most of my trips I’m using max 10 plastic bags. I’d guess the canvas bags cut down on maybe 90% of my plastic sack usage.

And I just like using em man

3

u/StandByTheJAMs Oct 06 '22

I keep reusable bags in the car, but I never remember to bring them in.

→ More replies

2

u/ryukin631 Oct 06 '22

That's what my Mom and I did, but we got ours at Trader Joe's. I also got two humongous bags from Square Enix for being a rewards member. They have been super handy for the both of us.

→ More replies

8

u/senseven Oct 06 '22

Technically, they banned the thin transport bags that only cost 10c. Those where usually single use. You still can get them in some places like drugstores. Supermarkets like Aldi or Lidl have now recycled hard plastic bags, but they costs like 50c, so people started to reuse them. Paper bags are also a thing, most clothing stores moved completely away from plastic bags.

→ More replies

24

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

Bottle deposits exist in many parts of the US as well, but they're so low that nobody but the destitute bothers attempting to collect them. This turns the problem of people not recycling into the problem of homeless people ripping through trash bags and getting trash everywhere to collect the bottles out of them. Given that plastic bottles aren't actually recyclable in the first place (cities usually send the majority of them to landfills and incinerators even if they're put in the right bin), I'd rather just have no deposit so that at least there's no incentive for the trash pickers to make a mess on the sidewalk.

15

u/8Legs-2Tentacles Oct 06 '22

I'm old enough to remember a lot of can and bottle trash in my rural state before the local bottle bill passed against great opposition from the beverage industry. There had been just tons of that shit in rivers and lakes and on beaches and in fields and on the side of the road, everywhere, but it all got cleaned up and never came back thanks to a 5¢ deposit.

Now I'm in a city and it's true that occasionally someone will shred garbage bags in a hunt for recyclables, but citywide there are no cans and bottles on the ground anywhere. It's a decent trade off. The system could be improved by raising the deposit with the rate inflation, which would take the 5¢ of the 70s that was so effective to about 30¢ now.

3

u/CosmicCreeperz Oct 06 '22

This is so true - apparently after it was instituted in the late 70s Michigan’s nation leading 10¢ deposit became 97% effective. But that’s the equivalent of about 3¢ today.

Thigh I think the difference is for the vast majority of people it’s now trivially easy to recycle bottles and cans - most have curbside home recycling and many cities have special bins.

Plastic is the real issue. My city has so many exceptions to what is allowed it feels like about 25% of common plastics can be recycled…

5

u/VanillaBear321 Oct 06 '22

I don’t know where you are, but here in Michigan literally everyone keeps and returns their bottles. The deposit is 10 cents each so you rarely ever see anyone put them in the trash in the first place.

2

u/mrs_leek Oct 06 '22

Same in Oregon. In my experience, it really depends of the state. When living in California, despite the CA CRV on the bottle (10¢ or something like that) we were getting peanuts when dropping said bottles. It's definitely not worth the effort. Once we moved to Oregon, as the rules were enforced, it's been a much better deal.

→ More replies
→ More replies

6

u/NoBicepz Oct 05 '22

What are the plastic bottles in the US made of when you say they arent recyclable? Our PET bottles in europe are 100% recyclable, we even have a dongle on the bottle caps now so people dont loose the caps and they can get recycled with the rest of the bottle

30

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

I was slightly abusing the term "recyclable" in my previous comment. Yes, American plastic bottles are "recyclable" in the sense that if you really want to you can melt them down and make something else out of them. However, that doesn't mean that anybody actually wants to buy the raw plastic produced at the end of this process. The thing is if you do plastic recycling cheaply you end up with a very low quality end product. If you want to make high quality recycled plastic you have to devote a ton of labor to sorting the input material and cleaning up the plastic. Nobody wants to pay for that when new plastic is both cheap and high quality. So, while most plastic is "recyclable" in the most basic sense of the word, the chances of it actually getting recycled are pretty low.

Also, while Europe does much better than the US in terms of collecting plastic waste, they don't d much better in terms of actually recycling that waste once they collect it. I couldn't find a nice article to link that lays out all the numbers, so I'll avoid quoting percentages here (40% of statistics are made up on the spot!), but a lot of the plastic collected in Europe ends up going to incinerators. It is a lot easier to produce useful energy from pure plastic than general garbage in an incinerator, so that is a benefit of enhanced collection, but really the best thing for the environment would be to just not use plastic packaging.

→ More replies

3

u/msg7086 Oct 06 '22

Here we are asked to exclude plastic caps from putting into recycle cart.

2

u/BlackLeader70 Oct 06 '22

It’s weird if I used the machine it says to remove the caps. But if I use the service offered by the state I’m supposed to leave them on.

3

u/MyBurnerAccount1977 Oct 06 '22

People really need to understand that recyclable only means something when you have a facility that can process the material, and when you have a market for the resulting lower-grade material. As it is, the recycling symbol and number only indicates the type of plastic (resin identifier code), not that it will actually be recycled.

4

u/YouThinkYouCanBanMe Oct 06 '22

Know a better incentive to prevent trash pickers? Increase the deposit to like $2. Anyone who thinks $2 is too much to throw away will collect them and anyone who doesnt will be swarmed by the homeless.

1

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

Yeah, I agree, if you could gather enough political will raising the deposit would be ideal. However, given that in the nearly 40 years bottle deposits have been around they haven't even managed to keep up with inflation I think that's unlikely to happen. So, since actually sorting plastic bottles into recycling doesn't come anywhere close to guaranteeing they get recycled anyways, I'd rather have no deposit than a pointlessly low one.

→ More replies

12

u/throwaway2454838 Oct 06 '22

Paper straws aren't worth the turtles it saves. They melt in my mouth. The straws, not the turtles

6

u/sielingfan Oct 06 '22

I, too, wish I were better at cooking turtles

→ More replies

2

u/hobbiehawk Oct 06 '22

Pfand = Deposit

2

u/Oijias Oct 06 '22

except paper bags are not necessarily resusable and kill our beautiful trees of which give all beings life

the best option is Cotton

8

u/RowdyRoddyPipeSmoker Oct 06 '22

they kill plentiful farmed fast growing trees made to die...it's fine we've got plenty.

-1

u/Oijias Oct 06 '22

whaaaa? what species? trees take years upon years to grow

this has been bothering me badly and has made no sense to me, using paper bags

cotton is plentiful and can survive in many climates - is washable, durable and reusable

3

u/RowdyRoddyPipeSmoker Oct 06 '22

yeah I don't know the species but there are farms just for growing trees for paper. They're super plentiful and only take a few years to grow before being cut. We aren't in some kind of need for paper we have plenty or renewable paper in fact I don't get recycling it I would imagine it takes way more resources to process old paper into usable paper again.

→ More replies

3

u/dinoroo Oct 06 '22

They typically use poplar and pine trees for people because they are fast growing. They are softwood trees.

→ More replies

-10

u/SmartEntityOriginal Oct 06 '22

Plastic was made to make people's lives more convenient and affordable. This is a step back in human progression.

I legit wonder if this "save the environment" BS is just a supermarket marketing scheme to reduce their costs.

4

u/OZeski Oct 06 '22

Until recently, I worked in packaging. This study looking at different bags (one-time use plastic, paper, cloth, reusable plastic, etc) was frequently discussed at professional get togethers within the industry. https://news.climate.columbia.edu/2020/04/30/plastic-paper-cotton-bags/ everyone was constantly trying to prove it wrong in some way, but HDPE plastic bags require significantly less resources to produce and have been determined to be more environmentally friendly on paper. The study didn’t factor in things like litter or likelihood for things to be recycled (if possible). Many designers were frequently trying to find a way to reduce packaging or create containers that don’t require additional packaging. The best solution will be one where you don’t need bags at all. Personally, I just bring some old milk crates to the store to load all my groceries into. Why fill a bunch of bags just to empty them again. Crates are far easier, reduce handling, etc.

2

u/Ominoiuninus Oct 06 '22

The main concern is that the degradation time for plastics is incredibly long. Plastics produced in the 1920s still exist in our oceans to this day. Micro-plastic is in everything, organic tissue, rainwater, food, ground soil, unborn fetus. We are lucky that plastic is for the most part non reactive but we have a very limited understanding of what it is doing to us if anything.

Environmentally paper takes more resources/energy to produce but we know that paper breaks down quite easily and doesn’t have any long lasting effects.

Either way people should just be using reusable cloth bags/high quality plastic bags vs 1 time use items.

As for supermarkets the cost of bags is such an absolutely minimal cost in comparison to the cost of goods sold. It has a near 0 impact on margins.

Completely eliminating plastics shouldn’t be our goal given their vast use cases but we should have the goal of using plastics smart and in the most sustainable way possible.

2

u/TheVoiceInZanesHead Oct 06 '22

Leaded gas was also made to make people's lives more convenient and affordable

2

u/JBow87 Oct 06 '22

Reduce costs and crush unions

→ More replies

-1

u/DonDraper1134 Oct 06 '22

Hey the US has a HUGE homeless and HUGE waste problem. This sounds like a really great idea to tackle two issues at once. People that are homeless have a source of legal income, contributing to society in an amazing way by lowering the level of plastic litter in the community, especially in urban areas where it seems most affected by both these issues.

11

u/RowdyRoddyPipeSmoker Oct 06 '22

You realize that's been a thing in many states for like...man I don't even know how long decades and decades.

→ More replies

1

u/FreeSkeptic Oct 06 '22

Give the homeless free housing for picking up trash? America would rather execute them.

→ More replies
→ More replies

50

u/nagmay Oct 05 '22

My understanding is that single-use plastic grocery bags are a recycling nightmare.

Sure, they are they not recyclable, but that isn't the only issue. They actually jam up the recycling center machines so badly, it makes the recycling of other waste way more expensive.

https://www.opb.org/news/article/metro-plastic-bags-recycling-trash/

8

u/baixinha7 Oct 05 '22

That’s interesting, I have been putting certain bags that are codified “2” in my recycling bin. Is there no better way to get them recycled?

8

u/nagmay Oct 05 '22

At least in my area - all bags, film, wrap, etc need to stay out of the city bins. However, you can drop off these items at a collection site. Often, this is just a nearby grocery or department store.

Looks like this site can help you find a location: https://bagandfilmrecycling.org/view/whattorecycle

Unfortunately... I suspect that right now most of these bags/film get dumped in the landfill. However, that is still much better than clogging up the machines at your local recycling center.

2

u/AllUltima Oct 06 '22

Definitely keep your films out of other recycling and have a "films only" bin in your home.

Personally, I drop them at the grocery store. I have no idea if they really get recycled, but the odds of them being recycled is certainly better if all the films / bags are put together (separate from other recyclables), because the sorting machines struggle with the films.

So even though sorting machines struggle with films, PTFE can certainly be melted down and reused. A block of tightly packed bags is the most enticing state for bags to be in, in the hope that they get recycled. I still don't know if this is cost effective compared to making new bags, but even if the bags go into long storage, the fact that they're sorted is a net positive for humanity.

2

u/dnroamhicsir Oct 06 '22

My city says to put all the bags in a single bag and in the recycling bin. That way it's easier to pick out on the conveyor belt.

9

u/somedumbguy55 Oct 06 '22

Companies are using “be green” to cut costs. That’s my Ted talk

3

u/k20350 Oct 06 '22

That and now this store is selling you bags instead of giving them to you.

→ More replies

389

u/BryanV21 Oct 05 '22

So it's all or nothing?

Even taking a single step to reduce waste is better than nothing.

30

u/Wyvrex Oct 05 '22

More than that, Plastic bags are generally not recyclable, plastic bottles generally are.

12

u/unecroquemadame Oct 06 '22

“Plastic bags that you get at the grocery store shouldn’t be put in your recycling bin. The same is true for any thin, flexible bag made from plastic. The reason is because they are usually made from either high-density polyethylene or low-density polyethylene. Both of these types of plastic are tricky to recycle because they are so lightweight and flexible that they end up getting caught in the recycling equipment!

Your best option is to bring your plastic bags to a store’s drop-off recycling center if they have one. These are usually in the lobby of supermarkets like Walmart, Jewel-Osco, and Target. Stores that offer these drop-off services bring them to specialized recycling centers where they have the right equipment to recycle the bags.”

2

u/AllUltima Oct 06 '22

This; the best answer is to sort films separately from all other plastics. PTFE can certainly be melted down and reused, the only problem is sorting machines. So don't rely on sorting machines, give them nothing but bags. A block of tightly packed bags is the most enticing state for bags to be in, in the hope that they get recycled. I still don't know if this is cost effective compared to making new bags, but even if the bags go into long storage, the fact that they're sorted is a net positive for humanity.

→ More replies

98

u/bright_shiny_objects Oct 05 '22

Yeah, same with the big Mac, fries, and a Diet Coke joke. You’re removing 500 calories and tons of sugar.

10

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

Ironically enough, McDonalds doesn't recycle.....neither does Starbucks.

12

u/PreownedSalmon Oct 06 '22

I don’t know much about the recycling process but doesn’t the food ruin the chance of recycling a thing? Like a pizza box can’t be recycled again, I’m assuming due to grease in the cardboard etc. Wouldn’t that be a reason to not really offer recycling as a bin option?

16

u/herpaderpadont Oct 06 '22

You are correct. Recycling centers will just toss any corrugated cardboard that is contaminated.

I had to do some court ordered volunteering and learned this.

13

u/MediumToblerone Oct 06 '22

I appreciate the phrase “court ordered volunteering”

3

u/Zkyo Oct 06 '22

I volunteered out of the good of my heart because I don't want to go to jail!

→ More replies
→ More replies

2

u/Eye-on-Springfield Oct 06 '22

It's not quite so cut and dried in my city:

"You can recycle pizza boxes - as long as there's only a bit of grease on them. If there's any food on the box - pop it in your black bin (general waste). It's possible that half the box is clean - in that case rip the box and put the clean part in your green bin (recycling bin)."

Source: Zero Waste Leeds

9

u/Radiant-Mail7566 Oct 05 '22

They do cardboard

3

u/bright_shiny_objects Oct 06 '22

Only shipping containers

→ More replies

4

u/samspock Oct 05 '22

The fun part is when the Diet Coke came in a fully plastic cup and lid....and a paper straw.

→ More replies

10

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

[deleted]

14

u/VegaSpec Oct 05 '22

Ah yes, hormones make you defy the laws of thermodynamics.

Consuming fewer calories than you burn will result in weight loss, regardless of what your hormone levels are. Drinking diet coke could potentially increase hunger, but it cannot "make you gain weight".

→ More replies

8

u/gilmour1948 Oct 05 '22

Yeah, except those are not facts, but long time debunked bullcrap myths. You need to update your weird blogs and trust me bro based "research".

3

u/Ghost_Alice Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

While I lean on the side of believing that diet sodas are probably worse than non-diet, the evidence is not exactly rock solid. It's based on metastudies with cohorts in the tens of thousands, which are inherently flawed because you can't control the variables, and you can't sort out confounding factors. In fact, confounding factors are a huge problem.

For example, the data shows that the diet coke has a much higher percentage of obese and diabetic drinkers. However, there's no data as to when they started to drink diet coke. Was it before or after becoming obese or diabetic? We don't know how many of them turned to diet coke after acquiring the condition they have, vs before.

There is also a self reporting bias present in the data. How do we know that the cross section of those who responded has the same statistics of those who did not respond?

Since some experiments with lab rats have shown metabolic and appetite issues in those fed diet coke, that's rats, not humans. So the results may or may not translate to humans.

It's a common misconception that mice and rats are ideal test subjects. In reality, out of all clinical trials based on mouse or rat models, the results only apply to humans as well a paltry 20% of the time. That is to say that 80% of mouse/rat experiments do not actually apply to humans.

But how different can they be? They eat the same food, right? Well, sort of... Humans can eat all the garlic and onions they want without getting sick or dying, while mice and rats can only eat tiny amounts without getting sick. Meanwhile, feed garlic or onions to a cat, dog, or even an herbivore like a horse, rabbit, or cow and you could very well end up with a dead animal on your hands because garlic, onions, and other aliums contain chemicals of a class called "organosulfoxides" which in most mammals causes the formation of something called "Heinz bodies" (not related to Heinz ketchup even though it contains both garlic and onion) which causes severe anemia.

There are other compounds in aliums that are toxic to other animals but not to us. These compounds directly cause cellular apoptosis by interfering with ATP production. Interestingly enough, it interferes with ATP in exactly the opposite manner as cyanide, meaning that eating copious amounts of garlic will make you temporarily resistant to cyanide. Not immune, just resistant, so don't get any bright ideas about drunk parlor tricks involving cyanide.

Mice and rats interestingly enough can eat larger amounts of aliums by body weight compared to other non-human animals without getting sick, but even they have a limit, where as humans for some strange reason appear completely immune to them.

So, point is, we can't exactly trust the data we have so far on the diet soda question...

That said, I do believe there is a high probability of diet sodas being more harmful to humans than non-diet sodas. However sodas in general are harmful, and if you need to consume diet soda to try to control your calories, you should probably be rethinking your diet in general.

0

u/bright_shiny_objects Oct 05 '22

Wait, so all the sugar in a regular coke is better?

0

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

[deleted]

33

u/ErrantNights Oct 05 '22

This isn't really true. Aspartame (artificial sugar) had one paper linking it to cancer, but in lab animals not humans, subsequent studies have not supported this and there is no scientific link between aspartame in humans and cancer, increasing weight, or other health issues such as blood glucose levels. Although drinking diet soda is not recommended for reasons as it having no caloric benefits, and drinks like water or green tea are healthier, drinking diet coke is better than drinking regular coke from a caloric standpoint.

6

u/Burnsidhe Oct 05 '22

There is a growing (if not definitive yet) body of evidence that aspartame does in fact contribute to insulin resistance by blocking cellular receptors, and does trigger the same 'hungry after consuming' effect of regular sugar, if not to the same degree.

Calorie-wise, taken in isolation, aspartame is better than sugar. But it is not an entirely benign substance.

8

u/ErrantNights Oct 05 '22

Really? Is this relatively new evidence? From what I remember reading aspartame had no effect on blood sugar. I think it was 0/day vs 2 cans/day vs 6 cans/day and there was no significant difference between groups after several months.

→ More replies

2

u/Ghost_Alice Oct 05 '22

That body of evidence is in lab rats and lab mice. 80% of all clinical trials based on mouse or rat models end up disagreeing with the actual mouse or rat model upon which it is based. This is because humans are not mice, and they are not rats either.

2

u/EmperorOfNipples Oct 06 '22

Aspartame is to full sugar as vaping is to smoking imo.

Sure it's not completely healthy, but it's a shitton better than chugging down hfcs.

→ More replies

-14

u/roran2009 Oct 05 '22

No one brought up cancer at all in any past comments… please stop going after a different thing than anyone is talking about.

Coke and Diet Coke are both bad, but Diet Coke’s fake sugar is actually worse for your body and still causes weight gain. As does sugar but at least sugar won’t cause other issues.

Let’s all just drink some water and focus

6

u/ErrantNights Oct 05 '22

I was just picking out some reasons people might think aspartame is worse for you than natural sugar, I wasn't implying you were talking about cancer. The take away from my post is that diet coke, while not good for you, is significantly better for you than regular coke. At least in that it has not been scientifically linked to things like cancer, blood glucose, or weight gain, while regular coke is obviously bad for blood glucose, weight gain, and cardiac health.

But yes, let's drink water.

1

u/stevenwnder Oct 05 '22

I mean isn’t weight gain a caloric deficit thing? So if it eliminates calories wouldn’t that help with weight loss? Obviously you can drink Diet Coke and still gain weight because to lose weight you need to actively burn calories to create a deficit so if you’re not doing that Diet Coke is not magically going to make you lose weight

→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/Spirited_Refuse9265 Oct 05 '22

What about people who are diabetic

→ More replies

1

u/Designer_Ad_376 Oct 05 '22

Truth is: you can replace them by just plain or carbonated water. It takes one or two weeks and you wont even remember the taste of the coke.

1

u/DonDraper1134 Oct 06 '22

I tend to replace soda with flavored carbonated water as well, feels better and tastes better than soda.

1

u/Designer_Ad_376 Oct 06 '22

Perrier lime cans are the best :)

→ More replies

-6

u/Cautious-Comfort-919 Oct 05 '22

I upvoted you to try to counterbalance stupid ass redditors. Everything you’ve stated is accurate as far as I know. Not that I’m good about what I eat at all but my simpleton understanding has always been that they just using artificials sweetners your body has trouble breaking down or expelling as opposed to a natural substance it can potentially shed easier.

Causing other health problems aside, natural things are better for you to eat/drink, who would have thought? 🙃

→ More replies
→ More replies

1

u/AdventureBum Oct 06 '22

Better yet, skip the fries and coke and just drink water.

-6

u/thuggwaffle Oct 05 '22

You are removing 500 calories from a 5000 calorie meal. If you really cared about your health you would eat a 500 calorie meal. People drink diet coke with their fast food because it makes them feel like they are eating healthy. Just like the environment posturing

6

u/AdventureBum Oct 06 '22

Most people need closer to 2000-2500 calories per day to be healthy. And most fast food meals are nowhere near 5000 calories.

→ More replies

1

u/unecroquemadame Oct 06 '22

A large Big Mac meal with fries and a coke is 1,320 calories.

You can enjoy it perfectly in moderation as a treat with a balanced diet and never gain weight if all you ate that day was just that meal.

I will do that tomorrow to get the adult Happy Meal promo.

→ More replies

21

u/thuggwaffle Oct 05 '22

No company gives a shit about the environment. They just know it makes them look good and sells products.

2

u/Lopsided-Equipment-2 Oct 06 '22

Man the Country Club I used to work at, when we had seafood nights we would end up tossing hundreds of lbs of cooked Dungeness crabs and the chef would get butt hurt if we tried to take as much as we could carry. I swear that place was going through thousands of plastic cups a day just for maybe 200-300 people and wasting so much water for the entertainment and sake of the affluent.

2

u/Alxcay Oct 06 '22

So what? Who cares. It still helps.

→ More replies

5

u/Dutchie444 Oct 05 '22

Also are we really surprised that of the two options a corporation went with the option that saves them money rather than losing additional revenue.

2

u/Snors Oct 06 '22

Saving money and GAINING additional revenue. They never charged for bags before. That's why these companies promote these absolute minimum efforts they make. It's doing precisely fuck all to help the environment or slow global warming but they think it makes them look good. It's the same with the recycling bins that all end up in the same landfill. The planet will be a burning hellhole before companies do something positive for the planet that actually effects their bottom line.

→ More replies

11

u/asymon Oct 05 '22

If they cared, they would have installed hydration station and encouraged using reusable bottles. Simple as that.

Oh, and obligatory r/hydrohomies advertisement.

-1

u/BryanV21 Oct 05 '22

So plastic bottles AND plastic bags is worse than just plastic bottles?

2

u/GoodGodPleaseWork Oct 05 '22

reusable

Important

2

u/CaseFace5 Oct 06 '22

I agree but it’s still kinda funny. Of all the places to put that bottle rack lol

0

u/jerrydiamond69 Oct 05 '22

I saw on Joe rogan the plastics are making people's taints smaller. I like my taint the way it is. Imho

→ More replies

7

u/Peet10 Oct 06 '22

The decline of store-provided plastic bags has caused a shortage of liners for my wastebaskets 😭

84

u/Terrin369 Oct 05 '22

Those look like thick plastic bottles, which are recyclable unlike plastic bags.

21

u/fartbox145 Oct 05 '22

Is throwing them into a third world country landfill mean recyclable?

7

u/T0lly Oct 05 '22

On a long enough timeline everything will recycle.

6

u/Semanticss Oct 05 '22

FYI: Plastic bags are recyclable at your local grocery store! As well as plastic packaging such as bubble wrap or what toilet paper comes in! You'll be AMAZED at how quickly you amass the stuff.

16

u/Kosmikdebrie Oct 05 '22

Reusable yes, recyclable no. It's always better to reuse than recycle anyway. Recycling is the least effective of the "reduce, reuse, recycle" triangle.

13

u/RichardsLeftNipple Oct 05 '22

For some reason the world was convinced that the economy needed to be built around the broken window fallacy. Then as a last resort the producers of products decided to blame the mountain of garbage on the consumer for not recycling.

Instead of the people who make things being blamed for making stuff we can't easily reuse or repair.

Which would naturally lead to reducing waste.

1

u/Downvotes_dumbasses Oct 06 '22

Capitalism needs waste. It needs excess consumption in order to keep profits constantly rising.

3

u/VegaSpec Oct 05 '22

They can be recycled, just not by normal recycling facilities. They require a special process that has to be plastic bags only. They will ruin batches of normal plastic recycling but that does not mean that they are not recyclable.

The stores aren't taking the plastic bags from those plastic bag recycling bins and putting them back at the checkouts to reuse.

2

u/Kosmikdebrie Oct 06 '22

Not in my state. We have a huge "wish cycling" problem in my area where we only process 3 kinds of recyclable materials and the plants are understaffed so when people recycle grocery bags and mountain dew bottles it ends up tainting the materials and then it all goes in a landfill.

1

u/Kosmikdebrie Oct 06 '22

Not in my state. We have a huge "wish cycling" problem in my area where we only process 3 kinds of recyclable materials and the plants are understaffed so when people recycle grocery bags and mountain dew bottles it ends up tainting the materials and then it all goes in a landfill.

3

u/Semanticss Oct 05 '22

Recyclable! Most grocery stores have a bin outside for plastic bags and films. Use it, please!

→ More replies

2

u/Semanticss Oct 05 '22

No idea why anyone would downvote this lol. PLEASE, I'm begging you, use the bin outside your local grocery store to recycle your used plastic bags and films!

5

u/Stringy63 Oct 05 '22

They might be down voting because that stuff is not recycled. It's a PR move to help consumers avoid guilt. Much of "recycling" ends up in the trash stream, so landfills and the ocean.

0

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

Those bins are actually harmful. They perpetuate the idea that plastic bags are recyclable when in reality they just are not. Yes, there exists niche industries that can find uses for the plastic, but the amount they consume is tiny compared to the amount of plastic waste that is produced and high-quality recycled plastic is often more expensive than new plastic.

No plastic is actually recyclable. None of it. Recycling bins exist to make you feel better about your consumption and blame individuals that don't recycle instead of the corporations that are too cheap to use alternative packaging materials.

→ More replies

0

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

They have a recycling symbol printed on them and your city will collect them, but that doesn't mean their chances of actually getting recycled are that much better than plastic bags. The reality is that hardly anybody actually wants to buy the low-grade plastic that comes from melting down old bottles. There are some niche uses and companies that are willing to pay a premium for the expensive tech required to purify recycled plastic for the sake of greenwashing, but most plastic bottles still end up in landfills and incinerators, regardless of which bin you put them in.

And speaking of theoretically recyclable... back when plastic grocery bags were the norm many stores had bins you could put them in to maybe be recycled. People saw right through that scam, and it's about time they realize plastic bottles really aren't much better.

→ More replies

39

u/Semanticss Oct 05 '22

Oh, you're trying to lose weight? And yet you still eat food? Interesting.

10

u/Excludos Oct 05 '22

We truly live in a society

32

u/TheHumanPickleRick Oct 05 '22

Where's the funny part?

12

u/souldonkey Oct 05 '22

I assume the rack of plastic bottles next to the sign about them trying to reduce plastic waste.

4

u/TheHumanPickleRick Oct 05 '22

That's not really funny it's just ironic.

3

u/souldonkey Oct 05 '22

I mean you're not wrong, but I didn't post it here.

17

u/MadClam97 Oct 05 '22

This is r/funny so you're in the wrong sub if you're looking for funny

7

u/SwifferSwetJet Oct 05 '22

Plastic bottles are relatively easy plastic to recycle where plastic bags are not easy at all

2

u/ClassyRedandGlassy Oct 05 '22

Brita filters and portable water bottles FTW

2

u/illintent99 Oct 06 '22

We don't have plastic bags anymore where I live. I now have 100,000 reusable bags though

→ More replies

2

u/Unfair-Thought5814 Oct 06 '22

Hey man, nobody shits on Micro Center. There is no better tech/gadget retail east of the Mississippi.

2

u/Training-Cry510 Oct 06 '22

I miss paper bags. I loved making my book covers! I’d fill it up completely with doodles then change it and start a new one

2

u/lil8mochi Oct 06 '22

Single use plastics are banned in Hawaii

2

u/Fyredesigns Oct 06 '22

Plastic bags are banned in my state and it just became the norm to bring a few reusables and a good quality tote with you Everywhere

2

u/zstandig Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

I don't really get why bags are targeted when there are so many other disposable plastic items out there

Go big or go home. Going after just plastic bags while giving disposable lighters, flossers, plastic forks/spoons/plates, etc, disposable razors, and all the other plastic disposables a pass is silly

2

u/Scary_Princess Oct 06 '22

They aren’t easily recyclable and they clog recycling machines complicating recycling and increasing the cost due to the time spent removing the plastic bags from the auto sorters.

They are also far more likely to negatively impact wildlife than plastic bottles.

2

u/Taterisstig Oct 06 '22

Tbf plastic bags for me just end up as trash bags. I’ve rocked the same smart water bottle for years and it lives in my car as the emergency water bottle.

2

u/Common-Cricket7316 Oct 06 '22

We just recycle the bottles 🤗

3

u/TonyTheBrony1 Oct 05 '22

Hey, those plastic water bottles can be refilled many times

3

u/Salty_Amphibian2905 Oct 06 '22

So clearly it’s because the plastic bags cost them money, but the plastic bottles make them money.

2

u/ChrisS74 Oct 05 '22

Plastic bags are evil, plastic containers are OK. Which part people do not understand?

1

u/Stringy63 Oct 05 '22

Plastic straws are the real culprit.

→ More replies

2

u/MarcusCaspius Oct 06 '22

...but also a source of revenue!

"Don't do it's bad. If you don't have one, we'll gladly sell you one and a profit!" - Corporate Hypocrites

2

u/k20350 Oct 06 '22

Recycling is about making money. China used to buy tons of our plastic scrap and now they don't. Lots and lots and lots of recycling bins get dumped in the same dump the trash goes in because there's not as much money in it anymore.

https://youtu.be/PJnJ8mK3Q3g

1

u/specialdocc Oct 06 '22

But it teaches people to reuse the bags they already have at home

2

u/EARSLAY Oct 05 '22

Single use plastic beverage bottles are a scourge on the planet.

2

u/DanimalHarambe Oct 05 '22

Luckily for me, l love irony.

1

u/UnicornPoopPile Oct 05 '22

I'm really glad my country had the system for plastic bottles where you pay a small amount extra and when you bring the bottle back to the suparmarket you get that money back. Encourages recycling!

3

u/Stringy63 Oct 05 '22

Encourages bringing them back. Many plastic bottles are not recycled. It's a marketing plot more than a real recycling effort.

1

u/21pacshakur Oct 05 '22

They should try paper bags. Totally recyclable and land fill friendly! They are also made from a renewable resource!

1

u/JagdRhino Oct 05 '22

Wonder what they use for trashcan liners

1

u/jerrydiamond69 Oct 05 '22

We are living in the goofiest time in the history of all history

1

u/xXPhoeniXx7 Oct 05 '22

lets not use plastic bags but hey check out this plastic water bottle for sale.

1

u/FGTRTDtrades Oct 05 '22

We’re reducing stabbing by supplying hand guns. Help us eliminate stabbing deaths

1

u/motorheart10 Oct 06 '22

Oxymoron. No bags, but yes water bottles.

1

u/OCE_Mythical Oct 06 '22

One thing I'll never let up on is paper straws. Holy fuck theyre shit. Happy to have a paper car before another shitty straw. Falls apart on the 3rd sip and I just take the lid off and skoll it. Obligatory millionaires in jets or whatever so I can enjoy a drink less.

1

u/sdtopensied Oct 06 '22

The texture of paper straws is crazy weird to me.

→ More replies

1

u/notaboutdatlyfe Oct 06 '22

This shit doesn’t do anything. Tell the commercial fishers to stop polluting oceans with their waste.

1

u/carefree-and-happy Oct 06 '22

Plastic shopping bags are not the same as plastic water bottles. (However all single use plastics should be phased out more aggressively.”

“Plastic bags that you get at the grocery store shouldn't be put in your recycling bin. The same is true for any thin, flexible bag made from plastic. The reason is because they are usually made from either high-density polyethylene or low-density polyethylene”

https://www.qualitylogoproducts.com/blog/can-you-recycle-plastic-bags/#:~:text=Plastic%20bags%20that%20you%20get,polyethylene%20or%20low%2Ddensity%20polyethylene.

More info:

https://recyclenation.com/2011/03/difficult-plastics-recycle/

Everything is done in steps, so first steps are to stop using plastics that are next to impossible to recycle.

1

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

Actually if we normalized buying, owning, and reusing your own higher quality bags people could like design them and stuff and it would way reduce plastic bags (what was found at the deepest part of the ocean), and create a new/stronger reusable bag industry with jobs and better styles than just brown or grey plastic bag

1

u/MousseDismal201 Oct 06 '22

I always thought of coming up with some edible water bottle...but nature kicked me to it and came up with a better invention? fruit flavored water in shape of oranges, watermelons, tangerines and many other sorts of fruits.

0

u/Proud_Azorius Oct 05 '22

My college once handed out very nice reusable water bottles on Earth Day… wrapped in a whole lot of single-use plastic. Cue “you tried” star?

0

u/Lestatt6 Oct 05 '22

Educating customers like it is 2010.

1

u/Brokenose71 Oct 05 '22

It is all bad with plastics, those water bottles have something like 300 times the amount of allowable micro plastics in drinking water . Plastics and water should never be together. Now it is bloodstream and fetal tissue . Good job 👍

1

u/sprauncey_dildoes Oct 05 '22

Why is this supposed to be funny?

1

u/Pickle-Rick2137 Oct 05 '22

I would ask about those plastic bottles but that's too much of an irony for one photo xD

1

u/brandanbooth Oct 05 '22

Those water bottles don't contribute at all

1

u/PilotAdvanced Oct 06 '22

Microcenter always has the best water.

1

u/FurbiesAreMyGods Oct 06 '22

In my city in Canada they haven’t had plastic bags in almost a year. Working fine for us.

1

u/ANOTHERLUMP Oct 06 '22

They really just wanna cut the manufacturing cost of plastic bags, but how can you hate when it’s for the planet!!!

1

u/abstractatom Oct 06 '22

Find it funny that fast food is now using paper straws but have made the paper cups all plastic now…

1

u/darkniteofdeath Oct 06 '22

Suffolk & Nassau County, New York has banned single use plastic bags a few years ago.

1

u/Pittedstee Oct 06 '22

Micro center needs to expand!

1

u/palfreygames Oct 06 '22

Politics wrapped up in one image

1

u/CaptainTim25 Oct 06 '22

The cynic in me still sees any corporation doing stuff like this as an excuse to charge the consumer for something that used to be free. Bottling water and selling it is another good example of this practice.

2

u/JediGuyB Oct 06 '22

I mean, it's definitely someone's excuse. Even if some of guys who make the decisions are sincere, I do not doubt there's some on the totem poll who happily sees it as passing on costs too the customer

1

u/throwmeinthecanal Oct 06 '22

It’s not even the alkaline smart water..

1

u/sdtopensied Oct 06 '22

That explains why they were “out” of bags today.