r/news Jan 14 '22 Silver 19 Gold 1 Helpful 19 Wholesome 18 Evil Cackle 3

Shkreli ordered to return $64M, is barred from drug industry

https://apnews.com/article/martin-shkreli-daraprim-profits-fb77aee9ed155f9a74204cfb13fc1130
54.9k Upvotes

View all comments

13.9k

u/Gingorthedestroyer Jan 14 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Take My Energy Starry

Let’s do insulin producers now.

4.1k

u/Colorado1996 Jan 14 '22

Made millions from hiking prices from $13.50 to $750

Damn, saw that line and thought they were talking about insulin. Price gouging has happened on multiple life saving drugs? People are the worst

1.9k

u/[deleted] Jan 14 '22

Insulin should have a co-pay of about $2. Or less.

2.0k

u/Colorado1996 Jan 14 '22

I think there’s a strong case that insulin should be free. But ya I’ll take $2 or less

1.2k

u/Reutermo Jan 14 '22

It is free by law here in Sweden. Have been since the 60s.

1.2k

u/SnooPineapples494 Jan 14 '22 Helpful

1.0k

u/biggestbroever Jan 14 '22

If this is communist california, sign me up

367

u/cool---coolcoolcool Jan 15 '22

We can also buy alcohol of all types from almost every store on any day. Fuck you utah, zion you’re cool

95

u/fawks_harper78 Jan 15 '22

Canyonlands and Moab is pretty dope. Navajo country, Bears Ears. There is a lot to love in Utah. There just happens to have backwards assholes in lots of places. Like most places.

52

u/kkeut Jan 15 '22

so, the good parts of Utah are the parts that are essentially uninhabited and under federal or indigenous control. this definitely jibes with what my ex-mormom friends say and what I observed during my visits

→ More replies

14

u/SeriouslyUnknown Jan 15 '22

Can confirm, just moved from Utah to California

5

u/johnhills711 Jan 15 '22

assholes? Like mormons?

→ More replies
→ More replies

35

u/--0IIIIIII0-- Jan 15 '22

And Texas. Totally loves that freedom, but can't buy liquor on Sundays. Lol. Packaged liquors anyway.

→ More replies

3

u/Egechem Jan 15 '22

Damn communist Safeway selling alcohols on a Sunday.

5

u/Raveynfyre Jan 15 '22

Just wish CoL wasn't so high out there. It's most comparable to my state weather wise, but isn't governed by an idiot Trumpanzee. I've lovingly nicknamed him Gov. DeathSentence due to his (mis)handling of this virus response, and it applies once again due to complete and total lack of testing sites funded by the state, etc.

2

u/ralphy1010 Jan 15 '22

The bodega never closes in NYC.

2

u/Mister_Brevity Jan 15 '22

Why does Utah have so many arbys. Haven’t been in years but I remember exactly two things. Floating down the river in Zion with fish biting the hair on my legs, and eleventy billion arbys.

→ More replies

273

u/Saith_Cassus Jan 15 '22

No, it’s far worse…. socialism!!!

I heard from Tucker that this can only mean the death of America if we don’t charge people a fee for being born with a genetic condition that can’t be cured and can only be treated daily.

133

u/ViniVidiOkchi Jan 15 '22

Remember when gay marriage was going to destroy the fabric of American society. And now nobody gives a shit.

13

u/Bigleftbowski Jan 15 '22

They need to find the next thing that will destroy America, otherwise, how else will they keep their audience in a constant state of paranoid frenzy?

→ More replies

8

u/myrddyna Jan 15 '22

There's people that give a shit, blame all their woes on it, and are actively trying to bring cases before our conservative SCOTUS to have that ruling reversed.

87

u/GETitOFFmeNOW Jan 15 '22

Oh, of course. "Destroying the fabric of American society" actually means "pisses me off that these people are allowed to exist."

→ More replies

4

u/Foux-Du-Fafa Jan 15 '22

And now nobody gives shit.

laughs in alabama

2

u/Sir_Ampersand Jan 15 '22

Have you seen drug prices? What do you think caused that? Obviously the gays with their aids, ffs

2

u/A_wild_so-and-so Jan 15 '22

Or rock n roll, or Dungeons & Dragons, or Mortal Kombat, or rap music, or interracial marriage, or ... or...

2

u/Regendorf Jan 15 '22

What do you mean, a lot happened

2

u/-ShagginTurtles- Jan 15 '22

Now they pretend like that wasn't them fighting against that. Same thing like drinking booze, smoking dope or giving women rights. When the hindsight makes you always look shitty, and the economy still sucks under right wing governments just as much as liberal ones (bc they basically have the exact same policies), maybe you're just on the shitty side y'know

2

u/A1sauc3d Jan 15 '22

Right! Blows my mind. Or how they said “global warming isn’t really happening”, then they said “okay it’s happening but it’s not that bad so we shouldn’t worry” next, now all they got is “okay it’s bad, but it wasn’t humans fault!” How can you see your side continually changing their stance and not think it’s a little suspicious.

2

u/seekingbeta Jan 15 '22

Allowing the gays to marry and legalizing marijuana have literally destroyed our society. God is looking down on Adam and Steve hitting each other's bongs and shaking his fists in fury.

→ More replies

2

u/sf_frankie Jan 15 '22

Not just daily. I’ve got a tube of the shit stabbed into my body 24/7 for the rest of my life! And I have to pay extra for that feature!

→ More replies

114

u/gbuub Jan 14 '22

In communist California, diabetes have you

0

u/Princess_Eevee9 Jan 15 '22

Have us what? =0

→ More replies

107

u/milk4all Jan 15 '22

If ever there was a state financially and socially ready to leave the union, it’s us. If it could be done without closing borders or too big a disruption to transport and trade, i wonder what that would look like with a few decades of preparation.

115

u/Splice1138 Jan 15 '22

With our ~54 electoral votes gone, the US would never elect another left president. It'd be Jesusland for real

53

u/fersure4 Jan 15 '22

If CA ever tried to leave the country many other states would follow suit.

I honestly wouldn't hate America splintering into several different countries.

→ More replies

2

u/wakenbacons Jan 15 '22

And they would liberate you and your resources IMMEDIATELY.

→ More replies

48

u/Hotshot2k4 Jan 15 '22

The last time some states were serious about leaving the union, it didn't end well though.

25

u/erc80 Jan 15 '22

Yeah even in the capacity that they’re talking about it; it would still be a territory (which would still be wild). “Union let’s it’s best earner go independent”; is a headline that’s never going to happen.

5

u/Haughty_n_Disdainful Jan 15 '22

Frankly, my dear…

→ More replies

6

u/jwmosher Jan 15 '22

I was under the impression that a good amount of infrastructure was based off power generation and water from the Colorado river?

-3

u/ShadowSwipe Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 15 '22

You are correct, not that that alone would matter because the entire idea is ridiculous; people often have only a very shallow understanding of the topics they speak on around Reddit and that is on full display here.

→ More replies
→ More replies

4

u/allharveybman Jan 15 '22

Can Massachusetts come to?

→ More replies

4

u/Pack_Your_Trash Jan 15 '22

California has two major trade ports for international imports. The trade balance between Calofornian and the rest of the US is heavily in favor of California. I guess the price of corn might go up... but who gives a shit?

→ More replies

4

u/thegroucho Jan 15 '22

I think you can pull it off and good luck if you do (non sarcastically).

But, equally, see Brexit.

In fact, fuck Brexit, sideways, with a cactus (the ones I see only in American movies in a desert) set on fire, wrapped in barb wire, garnished with broken glass and nettle.

→ More replies

1

u/myrddyna Jan 15 '22

It's illegal. Your government would be imprisoned, and marital law would be implemented.

3

u/SweatyToothed Jan 15 '22

But I don't want to get married again... /s

2

u/milk4all Jan 15 '22

Thank you redditor #10; we’re exercising imagination, not writing a declaration for succession. There will be no brexit, no succession, no civil war, no political takeover… but we could manage. Feel free to find more informative replies regarding this.

→ More replies

7

u/aquoad Jan 15 '22

But what about the big effort going on to make people think california is terrifying and crime ridden!

2

u/Bullen-Noxen Jan 15 '22

Sign the whole country up. Anyone who doesn’t like it can dig a hole in the ground & lie in it, covered with the dirt removed from the hole.

3

u/biggestbroever Jan 15 '22

If this pandemic has taught me anything, it's that people are willing to die so that other people can't have nice things

→ More replies
→ More replies

32

u/MBThree Jan 14 '22

Your link is from 2020, is there any recent developments on this? Really hoping this plan moves forward

47

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

[deleted]

6

u/GETitOFFmeNOW Jan 15 '22

The sheer relief of human suffering and anxiety is going to make the entire country 17.6% lighter. Bless Newsome's handsome little head.

2

u/FreshUnderstanding5 Jan 15 '22

Your aunt is a smart lady

→ More replies

-19

u/SnooPineapples494 Jan 14 '22

Seeing how 2020 was 14 months ago, I'm sure you can google this all by yourself.

7

u/kevlarbaboon Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 15 '22

Usually I'm with you on people refusing to Google shit but you literally posted a link about something people assume you're interested in. They weren't trying to use you because they're too "lazy" too Google, it was real engagement.

12

u/Lyad Jan 14 '22 edited Jan 15 '22

Ya know, some of us choose to socialize while we get information, like the Dutch “chat checkout.”

9

u/SoundOfTomorrow Jan 15 '22

You posted it, I figured you found something new.

24

u/DavidG993 Jan 14 '22

God damn it I love living in this state

20

u/BeachSandMan Jan 15 '22

Me too. In my experience, the people who hate on California always seem to be dialing in from some Midwest or Southern shithole

20

u/DavidG993 Jan 15 '22

Oh, you mean those states that are being propped up by the tax money from CA?

Yeah, those states are shitty and full of dead company towns

→ More replies

5

u/GETitOFFmeNOW Jan 15 '22

I live in the Midwest and the only thing I hate about California is how I can't afford to buy a house there.

6

u/Hendrixsrv3527 Jan 15 '22

You can like California and acknowledge there’s some major issues going on with the state

2

u/DavidG993 Jan 15 '22

I do. No state is perfect, but policies here get adopted by other states all the time so I'm gonna keep loving this place

→ More replies

2

u/star0forion Jan 15 '22

Or those Californians who live in State of Jefferson territory. California is great.

3

u/noptamoius Jan 15 '22

That’s amazing. Hope it works out and California can export to other states too.

2

u/Jfk_headshot Jan 15 '22

Sucks that due property taxes and other things the only people who can afford to live there without cramming 8 people in a studio apartment are the rich and I guess homeless.

2

u/aarondoyle Jan 15 '22

California straddles a very fine line to being its own country. I think it would be, but that's just me and I'm happy to disagree politely.

4

u/ron_leflore Jan 14 '22

The problem is that most people don't use plain insulin anymore. They want the fast acting or the long lasting or a combination of the two.

5

u/[deleted] Jan 15 '22

[deleted]

2

u/ron_leflore Jan 15 '22

My point was that the fast acting and the basal insulins are two different types of insulin. California is probably going to produce the plain insulin, which is a fast acting insulin.

If you are worried about the price, use https://www.insulinaffordability.com/ it will be $35/month for whatever insulin you need.

2

u/domuseid Jan 15 '22

That doesn't really seem like much of a problem

3

u/divDevGuy Jan 15 '22

IKR! Insulin is insulin. Just like asthma inhalers and antidepressants. /s

You apparently are not a diabetic if you think having the right type of insulin isn't much of a problem.

→ More replies

1

u/chubbysumo Jan 15 '22

the issue is that they aren't making "good" insulin, I think, they are making basic insulin, which can be cheaply made and bought. what people need are the more advanced ones, that help regulate blood sugar over time, so you don't have to check as often.

3

u/Maimster Jan 15 '22

I feel like a few more finger sticks is an okay alternative to dying without a life saving medicine.

3

u/chubbysumo Jan 15 '22

yes, but it also means that people that aren't used to that kind of monitoring and food monitoring end up having issues, because they started with novalog/humalog or extrel versions that they don't have to do that at all. this has killed people already because doctors and nurses already don't explain how along with more sticks during the day, you need to do food glucose counting.

3

u/Maimster Jan 15 '22

If you have access to that stuff you’ll still have access. This is for people who can’t afford medication, or don’t want to have to pay for a name brand that does relatively the same thing. It really is a medical grade, synthetic insulin not unlike what other countries use, or even some of the name brands in circulation now. Also, basic information is available for everybody. A sliding scale based on glucose intake during meals is quite easy to maintain and explain for new patients.

→ More replies

20

u/HoseNeighbor Jan 14 '22

I don't think Sweden has as many idiots so easily convinced that universally accessible healthcare impinges on their personal rights. I mean, if someone really would rather accept insanely inflated costs, I'm sure someone will start boutique healthcare for them. I'd like to point out that they're currently giving a big thumbs up to making money from people who have NO choice but pay or DIE, while knowing those making the money certainly do NOT need it.

2

u/Oddyssis Jan 15 '22

Ofc they need it. How else will they pay off the mortgage on their fifth house and their new jet?

→ More replies
→ More replies

99

u/IronicBread Jan 14 '22

But muh communism

127

u/[deleted] Jan 14 '22

[deleted]

88

u/TailRudder Jan 14 '22

Let them, then invade them, turn them back into a territory, and don't let them have senators.

20

u/Chillbruh469 Jan 15 '22

You might have a harder time fighting cartels off in Texas then actual Texans. The cartels basically own the bottom half of Texas. It Texas ever leaves they are going to have a bloody cartel fight to keep their land.

→ More replies

36

u/xpdx Jan 15 '22

Give their place to Puerto Rico, Texas can get back in once PR votes to let them back in.

5

u/TucuReborn Jan 15 '22

In all seriousness though, our territories should be converted into states.

→ More replies

2

u/klavin1 Jan 15 '22

Wall them off too

→ More replies

39

u/HHH-mods-are-snakes Jan 15 '22

Argued with a dude in /r/conservative and he hit me with "So you blue states would have no problem if we decided we want to secede then right?". These people are delusional and have no idea how the world works.

18

u/tiefling_sorceress Jan 15 '22

Oh no whatever shall we do.

21

u/Ragnarok314159 Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 15 '22

Pay less In federal taxes from having to support all the red state leeches? That would be nice.

Republicans/Conservative people have the same mindset as housecats - they walk around pretending to be tough, when in reality are fat, stupid, and have no understanding of the science and the system that supports their lifestyle.

→ More replies
→ More replies

11

u/Leviathan3333 Jan 15 '22

Problem is, anything like laws and lines are person made and subject to social construction. So when enough delusional people believe it’s possible to do something…well you get people storming Capitol Hill.

2

u/Lost4468 Jan 15 '22

Does it matter if they're delusional? I really don't get why Americans are so opposed to states seceding. If a state wants to secede, and there's reasonable requirements for doing so (a super-majority of e.g. 67% and a voter turn-out of 70%), they should absolutely be allowed to.

I don't see how anyone can justify forcing a state to stay regardless of what they want. And at the same time Americans will also nearly always stand up and support secessions in other countries, so long as the population actually wants it. Why doesn't that apply in the US? Again so long as reasonable requirements have been met (you certainly can not do it on a normal 50%+) they absolutely should be able to.

It's unjust to force them to stay, and it pretty much always ends up turning into a conflict which ends up causing problems for everyone.

If they can get the requirements, let them leave. Then watch as they absolutely fail and fall apart. When they inevitably want to come back, force them to be an unrepresented territory until they're stable for a period. Then eventually let them back, and maybe split them up into multiple states to prevent them being stupid again.

→ More replies

5

u/aquoad Jan 15 '22

oh man, go for it guys!

2

u/Pack_Your_Trash Jan 15 '22

Independent Texas would be a petrol state.

→ More replies

2

u/ShavenYak42 Jan 15 '22

Let them go, then maybe kids in the rest of the US can have textbooks with actual facts in them.

→ More replies

39

u/Captain_Smartass_ Jan 14 '22

Sweden = North Korea

14

u/northwesthonkey Jan 14 '22

North Korea=Finland

6

u/Michchaal Jan 14 '22

I mean both Koreans and Finns are pretty much Mongols, right?

→ More replies
→ More replies

24

u/cire1184 Jan 14 '22

This is America

37

u/Interesting_Market Jan 14 '22

Don't catch an illness here

17

u/onetwenty_db Jan 14 '22

It is the bill you fear

→ More replies

10

u/NotFlameRetardant Jan 15 '22

It is my freedom to spend twice as much on healthcare as the next closest country while receiving none of the benefits!

→ More replies

7

u/V0dkafa11 Jan 14 '22

Det är bra men vissa amerikaner tycker att Sverige är ett demokratiskt socialistiskt land. Det är det inte.

8

u/[deleted] Jan 14 '22

Det är bra men vissa amerikaner tycker att Sverige är ett demokratiskt socialistiskt land. Det är det inte.

"That's a good thing, but some Americans think Sweden is a democratic socialist country. It's not."

11

u/[deleted] Jan 14 '22

Who gave me a thumbs-down just for TRANSLATING???

→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/chefjenga Jan 14 '22

Silly Swedes. Thats not "free"! Any warm blooded 'murcan knows you've got to pay a price for freedome!!!

(and in this case, the price is thousands of dollars a year not to die)

/s

2

u/jkuhl Jan 14 '22

It was supposed to be free. The guys who invented it intended for it to either be free or incredibly cheap.

This bullshit today? It's not what any of them wanted.

2

u/Factorybelt Jan 15 '22

Yeah, but you don’t have freedom like we do in America!

/a

1

u/[deleted] Jan 14 '22

That's because Sweden is a progressive country and the US is not (sigh).

→ More replies

98

u/meco03211 Jan 14 '22

Won't someone think of the poor stakeholders? Should they suffer because people choose to become diabetic? Have they tried not being diabetic?

98

u/jetsetninjacat Jan 14 '22

Ive been trying 25 years. You know 120 years ago when diabetics were real diabetics, they just slipped into comas and died like real men and women. Not like us sissies today.

29

u/Basgerin Jan 14 '22

Yeah you should just die like a real man.

People have become so soyified.

→ More replies

9

u/monstrinhotron Jan 15 '22

They weren't real men! Most of them died as toddlers before they could grow up.

T1 diabetic for 4 years. Very grateful for the insulin.

3

u/jetsetninjacat Jan 15 '22

I learned something fascinating the other day when reading about J. R. R. Tolkien. His mother had Type 1. Now before insulin was finally purified and useable for humans they did come up with a kind of treatment. This treatment was after they tried the eat sugar one(yes they really did that). Anyways they learned a near starvation dier with exercise could help a diabetic live long enough. Tolkiens mom lived until 34 when she finally died from DKA. Before insulin, 34 was essentially the top age a diabetic could reach with the starvation and exercise plan.

2

u/monstrinhotron Jan 15 '22

My version today is a low carb diet and a 3 mile walk everyday.

2

u/jetsetninjacat Jan 15 '22

Yeah type 2, sure. Not for us type 1.

→ More replies
→ More replies

2

u/krozarEQ Jan 15 '22

Damn millennials these days think they're entitled to living! Hell my grandpappy ate nothing but bacon and syrup, smoked 2 packs before lunch, cut out a melanoma every day and walked around punching rattlesnakes in the face.

→ More replies

10

u/RWGlix Jan 14 '22

Novak said of you have a really positive attitude about it you will be okay

2

u/Rye_The_Science_Guy Jan 15 '22

Praise be to supply-side Jesus

→ More replies

3

u/Greenfire32 Jan 14 '22

It costs between $2-$4 to produce a single vial of insulin. The fact that drug companies are selling it for $100+ isn't just criminal, it's inhumane.

3

u/Oreganoian Jan 15 '22

It's amazing to me that dialysis is completely free in the United States but insulin isn't.

2

u/Grantlet23 Jan 15 '22

Read the first paragraph

I thought this was right. Sadly the greedy bastards thought otherwise

2

u/No-Function3409 Jan 15 '22

I'm just amazed no one's looked at the American health market, seen its horrifically over priced and simply... undercut all the competition while still making a ton of money.

2

u/time_wasted504 Jan 15 '22

If Argentina can make it free...?

A country that is economically fucked. Makes you wonder.

Lantas and Humulin are free in Kuwait. Jussayin.

https://worldpopulationreview.com/country-rankings/cost-of-insulin-by-country

2

u/Lucky-Variety-7225 Jan 15 '22

Word, it is a preventative drug. Hospital costs from Not taking Insuline would eat any benefits. The "real" scam is killing the poor, while shielding the middle class.

25

u/Asmodean_Flux Jan 14 '22

There's a strong case that everything being free would be wonderful. The day where everyone can have robots doing everything can't come soon enough, for me.

33

u/ElaborateCantaloupe Jan 14 '22

We have tons of robots and all we have seen is more pressure to produce more with fewer people, other worker exploitations like a larger wage gap. What do you think will happen when even more human jobs are replaced by technology?

18

u/Tibetzz Jan 14 '22

Hopefully, common sense regulation encouraging and supporting the comfort of a permanently majority-unemployed populace.

In reality, exactly what you described continuing to get worse.

7

u/AngelusAmdis Jan 14 '22

How about a more accessible higher education and reduced working hours/retiring early as most everything becomes automated and the need for manpower is mainly just for new innovations and maintenance, and entertainment

0

u/[deleted] Jan 14 '22

[deleted]

0

u/mytwocentsshowmanyss Jan 14 '22

Damn so you're just casually down with genocide

→ More replies
→ More replies

2

u/veedubfreak Jan 14 '22

I've been doing my job perfectly fine from home since March of 2020. They're still trying to force us back into the office for ZERO FUCKING REASON.

→ More replies

67

u/GrandpasSabre Jan 14 '22

Robots are being used all the time all over the world. At the Renesas Saijo wafer fab in Japan, you can see giant robots on the road doing a sort of dance around each other as they bring chemicals from one location to another, and inside there are smaller robots carrying equipment down the hallways. In the clean room, there are tracks up above with robots carrying semiconductor wafers (that turn into computer chips) from place to place, like miniature trains.

Robots are everywhere and being used all the time!

Robots could be used to reduce our working hours and make life easier for humans. Instead, they are used to maximize profits for the company by reducing the work force. Instead of using robots to minimize the work humans need to do and make life easier for all of us, robots are being used to minimize the number of humans on the payroll.

Its fucked.

The day when robots can do everything is going to be a very sad day.

4

u/exus1pl Jan 14 '22

Do you realize that most of the stuff that robots transport is hazardous and giving this job to humans is exposing them to those materials? Also despite protective clotting humans tend to shed skin and hair, so in some areas humans are just bad for technological process.

It might be more than humans are expensive on payroll.

1

u/GrandpasSabre Jan 15 '22

Do you realize that most of the stuff that robots transport is hazardous and giving this job to humans is exposing them to those materials? Also despite protective clotting humans tend to shed skin and hair, so in some areas humans are just bad for technological process.

Do I realize what the industry I work in is like? Yes, most likely more than you.

Humans transport hazardous materials literally all the time without being exposed. The robots are not doing a job that humans can't do without being exposed to hazardous materials. And a lot of those robots are literally going down the same hallways that people walk through (my coworker jumped in front of one to see if it would stop for him, mostly as a joke.)

As for human skin and hair, yes, this is a problem in clean rooms, which is why the humans that do work inside are wearing full bunny suits and have specific dress procedures before going into the clean room. I know this because I have spent hours and hours and hours and hours wearing these suits in clean rooms all around the world.

But in the end, I think you're completely misunderstanding me.

I am not advocating AGAINST using robots. I'm all about using robots. What I would like is for the work robots do be taken off of the workload of humans, rather than cutting the human workforce.

We could either work 30 hour weeks with robots taking over a lot of job duties, or companies could cut their work force by 25% and increase their profits. And the companies will always do the latter.

Basically, our long term goal should be for robots to reduce the number of work hours humans have to do, not the number of human workers.

32

u/morbie5 Jan 14 '22

Japan doesn't want immigrants so it is robots instead.

Robots could do a lot more of the farm labor here in the US but our feudal lords that own the farms would rather bring in cheap labor from south of the border and exploit them. If they had to pay 20 or 25 bucks an hour for farm labor they would use robots instead.

15

u/GrandpasSabre Jan 14 '22

Japan isn't the only country.

At the Bosch wafer fab in Reutlingen, Germany they have robots transporting wafers (its common in almost all high tech wafer fabs) and even robots mowing the lawn.

6

u/Mental_Medium3988 Jan 14 '22

ive thought about getting a robot lawn mower but i dont trust the meth heads or the kids, not in a bad way but kids will be kids and do dumb things, to not steal it.

3

u/GrandpasSabre Jan 15 '22

Probably a good idea. Plus, sooner or later they may gain sentience and run off with your microwave.

10

u/JayV30 Jan 14 '22

Personally, I don't want no robot making my nilla wafers. They terk err jerbs!

→ More replies

2

u/FoxSquall Jan 14 '22

Robots make life easier for the humans that own them. The problem is that the owners and the workers are two separate groups of people, and the latter's income has been tied to the very thing the robots eliminate.

→ More replies

2

u/cC2Panda Jan 14 '22

It's beyond that though. People who ration cheaply produced drugs or who can't afford them end up in the ER. Those people are more likely to declare bankruptcy and those costs get deferred to the rest of us.

There is a cost to not treating illnesses properly. The average type 1 diabetic uses between 4 and 12 dollars(production costs) of insulin per day.

The average disability pay in the US is $1,236/month in 2021 if something happens, not to mention lost taxes from earnings.

Most foot surgeries are around $10k-25k not sure exact price for something like gangrene.

In sure they're are tons of other costs and comorbid illnesses to not having insulin, but let's just look at those 2.

Suppose someone doesn't get insulin gets gangrene and goes on disability until they die. That's at minimum 3 average peoples insulin for a year just for the surgery, then 6 peoples cost of insulin every year in disability pay out.

Other complications includes kidney damage which the cheapest method is an average of $32.5k a year which is another 12 peoples total insulin cost.

As you keep adding these up, you can see that all it takes is for a small fraction to have complications because they lack medicine and you end up paying more. So unless you suggest we just let people die not giving insulin free is the expensive option.

2

u/BanalityOfMan Jan 14 '22

The day where everyone can have robots doing everything can't come soon enough, for me.

The day you don't produce for the wealthy is the day they'll watch you starve to death.

2

u/Mixels Jan 14 '22

The day when everyone can have robots will not ever be the day when everything is free. Instead, it'll be the day when everyone is dead except the people who have robots.

2

u/Asmodean_Flux Jan 14 '22

But if everyone has robots, then it just makes sense that the people who don't have robots are dead. What else would they be doing since everyone has robots?

2

u/Mixels Jan 14 '22

They'd be busy being dead, having recently been made so by the robots.

2

u/Asmodean_Flux Jan 14 '22

Sounds freeing to me, but then again I'm depressed.

→ More replies

2

u/MysteriousStaff3388 Jan 15 '22

A Canadian developed it and said it was free. It’s not life saving; it’s life sustaining. That some asshat decided to take an open source and make it pay to play? Only in Capitalism.

2

u/marinuss Jan 14 '22

I mean someone still has to pay for the multi-million dollar factories that make it. For the $0.50 per epipen or whatever it costs in materials for the packaging, etc. But spread among the whole world you'd think it would be cheap enough "per user/dose" that it could just be a random line item on what people pay for their insurance premiums and it's just free.

→ More replies

61

u/cedarapple Jan 14 '22

We all pay higher insurance premiums due to price gouging on basic medicines that are covered by insurance.

19

u/PanJaszczurka Jan 14 '22

That pill cost 0,04-0,50 USD worldwide.

→ More replies

62

u/_KingKaliYuga Jan 14 '22

Insulin should be free, like any other life-saving drug. What the fuck else are taxes for.

47

u/ripvannwinkler Jan 14 '22

Bailing out bad investments and playing world domination station, of course.

→ More replies

11

u/slurricanemoonrocks Jan 14 '22

poor people, duh.

5

u/toth42 Jan 15 '22

Lol no then we'd save the lives of the poor too, no one wants that(incredibly, a lot of poor people seriously agree with my sarcastic stance)

→ More replies
→ More replies

116

u/TittyMcNippleFondler Jan 14 '22

But how would they make money after all the expenses related to research and development that were funded by grants that were funded by our tax dollars?

221

u/Gingorthedestroyer Jan 14 '22

When inventor Frederick Banting discovered insulin in 1923, he refused to put his name on the patent. He felt it was unethical for a doctor to profit from a discovery that would save lives. Banting’s co-inventors, James Collip and Charles Best, sold the insulin patent to the University of Toronto for a mere $1. They wanted everyone who needed their medication to be able to afford it.

105

u/Lisa-LongBeach Jan 14 '22

Same for Jonas Salk… I believe his response to why not patent his cure for polio was “Would you patent the sun?” A different world and morals today sadly.

42

u/_greyknight_ Jan 14 '22

Would you patent the sun?

Uh, duh!

- Fortune 500 CEO

→ More replies

20

u/horseydeucey Jan 15 '22

Nestle, would you patent... water?!

47

u/Jonne Jan 14 '22

Yeah, ask a capitalist if they would patent the sun and they'd be on the first rocket to the interplanetary patent office.

3

u/Raptor169 Jan 14 '22

Speaking from memory so correct me if I'm wrong but I remember Salk did try to patent but was rejected because polio vaccine was considered part of nature.

Still doesn't take away from your point though.

6

u/Lisa-LongBeach Jan 15 '22

I’m pretty sure those were his words, but not 100% sure. Back then unrestrained greed wasn’t as acceptable or worshipped as it is today

3

u/Raveynfyre Jan 15 '22

A different world and morals today sadly.

I really wish some things had never changed.

51

u/Discreet_Deviancy Jan 14 '22

THIS! It was never intended to be a for-profit product.

→ More replies

16

u/GreenStrong Jan 14 '22

That insulin is still very cheap; modern versions last longer and enables better regulation of blood sugar. They still shouldn’t cost as much as they do. The researchers who invented them should be rich, but it should not be such a racket for the corporations that produce it.

5

u/IcarusOnReddit Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 15 '22

Researchers don't make the big money, the bloodsucking CEOs do.

1

u/A_giant_dog Jan 15 '22

The people who make the money are investors. C level folks at those companies get kinda rich, the investors get filthy rich

→ More replies

3

u/SirReal14 Jan 15 '22

And that type of insulin is $20 at Walmart. Modern, significantly safer insulin that has been recently invented is what is expensive.

4

u/markh110 Jan 15 '22

You say that like it's a reasonable thing; you can get about a year's supply of modern insulin in Australia for ~$55USD. Americans are being exploited, and I'm so angry on your behalf.

→ More replies

5

u/Red_AtNight Jan 15 '22

It's worth pointing out that Banting's method was to extract insulin from a dog's pancreas. It worked, but it wasn't very efficient. For about 50 years, all commercial insulin came from cows and pigs from slaughterhouses... similar issues to dog pancreas, and because it came from non-human animals, it had a risk of causing allergic reactions. That was the state of things until 1978 when synthetic insulin was first invented.

Basically all of the insulin that humans use nowadays is produced synthetically, through processes that are patented, and are not the process that Banting and Best developed in 1923. They work a hell of a lot better, but that's why insulin is still expensive despite Banting and Best selling their patent.

2

u/ImpossibleEffort4313 Jan 15 '22

He should’ve put his name on it so he could’ve controlled the price for it.

4

u/Nomandate Jan 14 '22

That was for the process of extracting insulin. Modern insulin is synthesized.

→ More replies

48

u/StinzorgaKingOfBees Jan 14 '22

Anything related to healthcare and medicine shouldn't be for profit. Then you are literally putting price tags on lives.

5

u/TheLizardKing89 Jan 14 '22

If there’s not a profit motive, there will be less incentive to invest in new pharmaceuticals. If someone develops a drug that improves the lives of millions of people, they should be able to profit from that. I’m not saying they should be allowed to charge whatever they want, but the idea that any profit is bad is just ridiculous.

16

u/khinzaw Jan 14 '22

Profit motive goes the other way too, companies have chosen not to develop drugs to treat rare diseases because they won't be profitable.

2

u/TheLizardKing89 Jan 14 '22

There isn’t any system in the world in which rare diseases get a ton of research dollars thrown at them.

7

u/horseydeucey Jan 15 '22

There isn't a system in the world in which rare diseases get a ton of research dollars thrown at them.

There's not?

Damn, someone totally should start one up... call it something like the, "Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network".

Oh wait, my bad. There is a system in the world in which... yadda yadda. Oh! And it's a part of the National Institutes of Health?! The largest single public funder of biomedical research in the world?!

But that can't be, you said such a thing doesn't exist.

4

u/TheLizardKing89 Jan 15 '22

The RDCRN has an annual budget of less than $40 million. For comparison, Americans will spend about half a billion dollars ($500 million) on Halloween costumes for their pets this year.

→ More replies

1

u/SeeArizonaBay Jan 15 '22

But but but my capital

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

2

u/GETitOFFmeNOW Jan 15 '22

With a straight face they say "it can cost a million dollars to get a drug researched and approved!"

And that's fine for us rubes who simply have zero concept of what a million dollars means, much less billions in profits.

3

u/Umarill Jan 14 '22

You are literally paying for it with your taxes, they shouldn't make millions out of health issues when you already pay for it.

→ More replies
→ More replies

13

u/enleeten Jan 14 '22

Fuck that. I'm not a diabetic but it should just be covered.

→ More replies

24

u/SlamMeatFist Jan 14 '22

How bout no co-pay and make it free without insurance? Insurance is awful and its crazy we exist in a world where insurance is needed for anything medical otherwise you pay our the ass for it.

13

u/[deleted] Jan 14 '22

Lots of European countries work that way. I don't know why the US can't.

2

u/A_giant_dog Jan 15 '22 edited Jan 15 '22

You don't? Gotcha - here's the quick and easy version. Folks have given drug companies a lot of money to develop, market, and sell drugs.

Those investors expect a return on their investment, and the folks who run these companies need to give that to them.

At no point does the well being or financial solvency of the people who need it to survive enter the calculus. Because that is allowed here.

→ More replies

3

u/Finsceal Jan 14 '22

Paying for insulin is a uniquely American problem

2

u/DancingKappa Jan 14 '22

I pay 0 for my insulin a family member pays 100 for each one...

3

u/ron_leflore Jan 14 '22

Send them here: https://www.insulinaffordability.com/

It's $35/month for however much you need.

2

u/TheAbyssGazesAlso Jan 14 '22

It's $5 for a 3 month supply in New Zealand.

2

u/ryanmuller1089 Jan 14 '22

To cover production, packaging, and shipping. If that.

2

u/feministmanlover Jan 14 '22

I'm a type 1 diabetic. WITH insurance my insulin is 175 bucks a month. My continuous glucose monitor and supplies is 400 every 3 months. Before my deductible is met, its THOUSANDS. It's disgusting.

2

u/Goznaz Jan 15 '22

Come to the UK it's free!

2

u/Jo_Ehm Jan 15 '22

The part that kills me is the original patent was sold for $1, to make it accessible to everyone.

2

u/AlaskaNebreska Jan 14 '22

Long acting insulin (such as Lantus and Levemir) costs more than $200 a vial. On the other hand, intermediate acting insulin (such as NPH) costs like 30 bucks a bottle. We need to educate our doctors. Twice a day administration isn't that bad and there is no proof long acting insulin works better for type 2 diabetic patients.

→ More replies