r/todayilearned Jun 28 '22 Helpful 1

TIL: The USA Declared the Marianas trench a National monument

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marianas_Trench_Marine_National_Monument
524 Upvotes

66

u/Budfudder Jun 28 '22

I was all set to say "How can they do that? It's not even in the US!" Then I read the wiki page and lo and behold...

"The United States could create this monument under international law because the maritime exclusive economic zones of the adjacent Northern Mariana Islands and Guam fall within its jurisdiction."

Live and learn.

1

u/e30Devil Jun 28 '22

Happy cakeday twin.

156

u/LegendOfBobbyTables Jun 28 '22

Bush's only legislation that actually holds water.

22

u/kingofcheezwiz Jun 28 '22

Very different to the other use of water during his administration.

16

u/diggemigre Jun 28 '22

Enhanced baptism?

10

u/EpicAura99 Jun 28 '22

A super fun sport from all the bodacious dudes at Guantanamo Bay!

7

u/ixamnis Jun 28 '22

Waterboarding at Guantanamo Bay sounds like a lot of fun if you don't know what either of those things are.

-4

u/RandoCalrissian11 Jun 28 '22

I know what both those are and fully support it in the way they used it.

1

u/diggemigre Jun 29 '22

Hell yes!

1

u/EpicAura99 Jun 29 '22

Because as we all know, torture produces such high quality intel. The subjects definitely won’t just say anything that the captor wants to hear to make it stop. Very reliable.

/s

-1

u/RandoCalrissian11 Jun 29 '22

That’s why you verify the information.

1

u/EpicAura99 Jun 29 '22

You’re missing the point.

It’s never right. It literally does. Not. Work.

The most successful Nazi interrogator took his subjects on long pleasant walks in the woods. You catch more flies with honey than vinegar.

0

u/RandoCalrissian11 Jun 29 '22

You catch more flies with vinegar than honey, and yes, that kind of interrogation works very well too. Both are useful tools and work on different people.

→ More replies

2

u/[deleted] Jun 29 '22

That administration is such a shitshow I thought you were making a dark reference to the mishandling of Katrina instead of waterboarding

1

u/joedirte70 Jun 28 '22

Using it in his bong?

1

u/kingofcheezwiz Jun 28 '22

They were fond of using a gallon jug of it to pour on top of an "enhanced interrogation" subject with a rag covering their nose and mouth.

2

u/PoorPDOP86 Jun 28 '22

Yes, bring out the Redditors who peaked in 2004.

-4

u/e30Devil Jun 28 '22

I don't know how you can really criticize someone when you're too stupid to know that a Presidential Proclamation isn't legislation.

2

u/OR-14 Jun 29 '22

I'm pretty sure they were just making a joke. You know, hold water? Like the Mariana Trench? Get it?

-1

u/e30Devil Jun 29 '22

Just because you’re making a joke doesn’t mean you have to make it obvious you’re a moron.

2

u/OR-14 Jun 29 '22

You're taking it way too seriously. It's just a silly joke. Chill out, guy.

8

u/Kampizi Jun 28 '22

That is where the aliens are

4

u/REVERANDJT Jun 28 '22

Is this after they buried Megatron there?

17

u/WhileHereWhyNot Jun 28 '22

I hope they meant International or Universal monument

92

u/minkju Jun 28 '22 edited Jun 28 '22

A National Monument is just a class of protected area that’s controlled by the US federal government, it’s not just some symbolic gesture. Due to Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands being under US jurisdiction, they had enough territorial waters to be able to declare this.

By declaring the trench a national monument, it protects it from commercialization or industrialization, as well as other environmental protections.

1

u/Bocephuss Jun 30 '22

God damn I guess this means they won't have a McDonalds

9

u/GogoatCheese1 Jun 28 '22

The Mariana Trench is located around the waters of Guam which the USA owns, so technically it is a national monument

2

u/EpicAura99 Jun 29 '22

The world’s tallest, largest, and oldest trees are all in national parks, nobody has a problem with that. Half of all geysers in the world too.

2

u/minkju Jun 29 '22

Yeah, it’s like nobody would give a shit if China and Nepal declared Mt. Everest a national symbol.

Any reason to take a shit on America on Reddit, someone will take it.

2

u/Budfudder Jun 28 '22

Interesting that the National monument doesn't include maybe the most well-known feature of the Marianas trench, which is the Challenger Deep, the deepest part of the ocean on Earth.

2

u/mattreyu Jun 29 '22

The 2nd biggest trench in the world, the first belonging to OP's mom

7

u/charmanderaznable Jun 28 '22

I bet Bush cant even name 5 of their songs

-3

u/Dodger7777 Jun 28 '22

Nuke storage/disposal?

6

u/ActedCarp Jun 28 '22

There are also 2 WW2 shipwrecks, which could be considered war graves in it, but that wasn’t know until relatively recently

3

u/AbortEveryone666 Jun 28 '22

Those wrecks are 1100 miles to the southwest of the Marianas Trench. They are in the Philippine Trench.

1

u/EpicAura99 Jun 29 '22

Dear god man, what on earth do you think National monuments are used for???

1

u/Dodger7777 Jun 29 '22

Clout? I had misread and thought they just declared they owned it. Then I remembered a Kurzgesagt video.

2

u/EpicAura99 Jun 29 '22

They’re natural preserves! They’re part of the national park system! And it is in US territory so yeah we do own it.

1

u/lukeren Jun 28 '22

I read that as 'marinara' and was very confused ...

11

u/Son_of_Plato Jun 28 '22

The Marinara Trench is better known as Chicago style deep dish pizza.

1

u/Rondaru Jun 28 '22

I read "Martian" and was even more confused.

1

u/DanYHKim Jun 28 '22

That would be the Great Rift Valley

1

u/REVERANDJT Jun 28 '22

saucy minx

1

u/SignificantView1671 Jun 28 '22

Thank you, James Cameron.

1

u/[deleted] Jun 28 '22

good luck with the guided tours.

-24

u/AngryQuadricorn Jun 28 '22

It’s not even in the U S A?!

27

u/ash_274 Jun 28 '22

It is within the economic exclusion zone from Guam and other US territory.

Countries with coastlines have the 12-mile limit around them where those waters are their sovereign territory. Beyond that, there are economic exclusion zones that can go up to hundreds of miles where other countries can’t extract natural resources (fish, oil, etc.), but can move ships or whatever else they to, freely.

-17

u/AngryQuadricorn Jun 28 '22

Thanks for that. I had no clue. Still feels like a stretch for the USA to “claim” it as a National Monument, but glad to know how it does somehow atleast fall into the US jurisdiction.

27

u/Kile147 Jun 28 '22

Claiming as a National Monument affords it protections against economic development. Since it is within the US economic development zone other countries can't develop there, and since it's a national monument private entities can't really either.

6

u/EpicAura99 Jun 28 '22

I mean it’s no different than all the other marine preservation areas in American waters. This one just so happens to be really deep.

-1

u/Jamesgardiner Jun 28 '22

Is it within the 12-mile limit, or just within the EEZ? Because if it’s just in the EEZ, this seems meaningless as the USA still aren’t party to UNCLOS, which is what defined EEZs.

13

u/qgmonkey Jun 28 '22

It's next to Guam

1

u/Zonel Jun 28 '22

It is though. Guam is a US territory.

-24

u/Aconductor2 Jun 28 '22

We should expect the drilling to commence very soon. / Or is this a refuge for the Sea Monkeys?

-18

u/ColonelMonty Jun 28 '22

I love the super deep hole filled with water, definitely a monument to... Something.

3

u/allthenewsfittoprint Jun 28 '22

In US law a National Monument is a preserved area of historic, cultural, or scientific interest. So just like the US has preserved various Fossil research areas for scientific study, so too did they preserve the deepest trench in the ocean.

1

u/EmbarrassedHelp Jun 29 '22

Its part of the territory of unique species like giant squid, for which we still lack proper population counts of.